Newport Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Newport Family Coat of Arms

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Newport Coat of Arms Meaning

Newport Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Newport. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Newport Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Newport blazon are the leopard’s face, chevron, crescent and pheon. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and sable .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Newport Name

Newport Origin:

England

Origin of Newport:

It is a fascinating and unique surname, also a regional surname which derives from the hamlets of Newport in Essex, Devon, Gloucester. Research suggests that previous documentation of the name is from the hamlet of Essex. Mostly regional surnames, Newport has been provided to the name bearers when individuals migrated from one place to another place or guarded the King of the Castle. The origin of the name is French, and it was through the Norman invasion 1066 that the name arrived as ‘Neuport’ – the resident at or belong to the Newport. The spellings forms of the name were Neuport (1273), Newporte (1574) and Newport (1654).

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Neweport, Newoport, Newpiort, Niewport, Neport, Neiport, Newpart, Newbort, Nweport.

England:

The surname Newport first originated in Shropshire where they held a family seat from ancient times and its first recording came on the census rolls taken by Kings of Britain to decide the rate of taxation of work or activities for citizens.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de Neufort, which was dated 1273, in The Hundred Rolls of Buckingham. It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272 – 1307.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Newport settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Newport who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Christopher Newport, who arrived in Bermuda in 1609 – 1610. John Newport settled in Virginia in 1648. William Newport, who landed in Maryland in 1670 and John Newport settled in Barbados in 1678 with his wife and child.

Some of the people with the name Newport who settled in the United States in the 18th century included John Newport, who came to Virginia in 1725. John Newport, who landed in America in 1760 – 1763.

Some of the people with the name Newport who settled in the United States in the 19th century included George Newport arrived in New York, NY in 1813. Richard Newport, who arrived in New York in 1846.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Newport who settled in Canada in the 18th century included John Newport, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Newport who settled in Australia in the 19th century included George Newport, an English prisoner from London, who shifted aboard the ship “Almorah” in April 1817, settling in New South Wales, Australia. William Newport and Ann Newport both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the same ship “Moffatt” in the same year in 1839.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Newport who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Joseph Newport at the age of 36, Mary Newport at the age of 25, Walter Newport at the age of 13, Jesse Newport at the age of 3 and Owen Newport, all arrived in Nelson in the same year in 1842 aboard the ship “Sir Charles Forbes”.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Newport: United States 5,286; England 2,221; Wales 305; Ireland 158; France 61; Australia 826; Scotland 112; Canada 435; South Africa 457; New Zealand 577.

Notable People:

Sister Esther Newport (1901–1986), was an American painter, artist and art professor who produced the Catholic Art Association.

Thomas Newport who was a 1st gentleman Torrington (c. 1655 – 1719), was an English army police officer for Ludlow, Winchelse, Wenlock and an accountant.

Thomas Newport was the 4th captain of Bradford (c. 1696 – 1762), and an English companion.

Henry Newport, who was the 3rd head officer of Bradford (1683–1734), an 18th-century English competitor and an independent politician.

Richard Newport (died 1570), was an army police officer for Shropshire.

Richard Newport, who was the 1st Lord Newport (1587–1651), was an English associate, army officer for Shropshire in 1614, 1624–1629 and Shrewsbury.

Richard Newport (MP) (1685–1716), was an English military police officer for (Much) Wenlock, and he was also the son of the 2nd commander of Bradford.

Newport Family Gift Ideas

Browse Newport family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Salop; descended from John de Newport, temp. Edward I.). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three leopards’ faces sa. Crest—A unicorn's head ar. armed and crined or, erased gu. Another Crest—A unicorn’s head erased ar. ducally gorged or.
2) (New Park, co. Kilkenny, bart., extinct 1862). Motto—Ne supra modum sapere. Or, a chev. gu. betw. three leopards’ faces sa. Crest—A unicorn’s head erased ar. armed, maned, bearded, and ducally gorged or.
3) (co. Hertford, and Welton, co. Northampton). Ar. (another, or) a fess betw. three crescents sa. Crest—A buck statant gu. attired, gorged, and chained or.
4) (co. Huntingdon). Ar. a fesse dancettee gu. a bend sa.
5) (co. Stafford). Gu. on a canton ar. a fleur-de-lis sa.
6) (Hanley Court, co. Worcester). Ar. a fess betw. three crescents sa. Crest—A fleur-de-lis or.
7) Az. on a bend betw. three frets ar. as many bugle horns of the first. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour garnished or, holding in the hand ppr. a sword ar. hilt and pommel gold.
8) Quarterly, gu. and az. a lion ramp. ar. (another, or).
9) Gu. six annulets or (another, tinctures reversed).
10) Sa. on a chev. betw. three pheons ar. as many mullets of the field.
11) Sa. a chev. betw. three pheons ar.
12) Gu, three wings elevated ar.
13) Per pale gu. and az. a lion ramp. ar.
14) Paly of six or and az., on a chief gu. three escallops ar.
15) Ar. on a bend sa. betw. two lions of the second a wivern extended of the field.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106