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North Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/North Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

North Family Coat of Arms

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North Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the North blazon are the lion passant and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the North Name

NORTH

The name North is of Anglo-Saxon/English origin. The surname is thought to possibly be topographical, indicating a specific geographical area. Some surnames actually acted as an indicator or representation of the birthplace of the individual by identifying easily recognizable landmarks. This worked well for the small settlements which existed at this time because people rarely traveled far from their homes and were familiar with the surrounding landscape. The name may also actually have derived from the name of a town or settlement which no long exists.

There are multiple variations of the spelling of the surname including but not limited to; North, Northe, and Northey among others. The variation in spelling of both given and surnames during this time period can be attributed to a lack of continuity regarding guidelines for spelling which was compounded by the diversity of languages in use in European countries at this time.

The earliest record of any variation of this surname is that of Aylmar del North which appears in the Suffolk “Pipe Rolls” from 1220. These rolls, often times called the “Great Rolls”, were a series of tax and census records kept by the English Treasury by order of King Henry III, with the oldest dating back to the 12th century. They hold the distinction of being the oldest consecutive set of records detailing English governance in the United Kingdom. These records span a period of over 700 years and have proven invaluable to researches over the years. The Sussex “Pipe Rolls” dated 1257 show a listing for John de North. William North appears in the Sussex rolls dated 1296 and Agnes Bynorth appears in the Essex rolls dated 1301.

The first recorded immigrant to America bearing the surname or any variation of the spelling was Thomas North who arrived in 1623 and settled in Virginia. Joe North landed and settled in Virginia in 1635. John North landed in 1635 and settled in New England. Jo North landed and settled in Virginia in 1635. John North arrived and settled in Connecticut in 1635.

There were also many immigrants to the British Commonwealth countries of Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, bearing the surname North. Richard and Mary along with their children, Thomas, Margaret, and Elizabeth landed in 1784 and settled in Saint John, NB, Canada. Mary Ann North landed and settled in Adelaide, Australia in 1847. Joseph North landed in 1848 and settled in Adelaide, Australia. H. J. North landed and settled in Adelaide, Australia in. Thomas and Mary Ann North along with their children, George, May, and Sarah arrived and settled in Nelson, New Zealand in 1842.

Worldwide, the highest concentration of people with the surname North are found in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. By state, the largest percentile of those with the surname North live in Utah and North Dakota.

There are many persons of note who bear the surname North. Sir Francis North, 1st Baron of Guilford PC KC was a lawyer and judge. He maintained a residence, Wroxton Abbey and family seat in in Banbury where he resided until his death in 1685. Lord North 1st Baronet’s heir apparent was his eldest son, who was named Francis also.

Sir Francis North, 2nd Baron of Guilford PC was a Member of the British Parliament, from 1703 until 1705 he was Lord Lieutenant of Essex, and was appointed to the Privy Council (PC). He maintained his residence at the family estate, Wroxton Abbey and family seat in in Banbury where he resided until his death in 1729. Lord North, 2nd Baronet’s heir apparent was his eldest son, who was named Francis also.

Sir Francis North, 3rd Baron of Guilford was a Member of the British Parliament. In 1752, he was created Sir Francis North, 1st Earl of Guilford. He maintained his residence at the family estate, Wroxton Abbey and family seat in in Banbury where he resided until his death in 1790. Lord North, 1st Earl of Guilford’s heir apparent was his eldest son, who was named Frederick.

Sir Piers Edward Brownlow North is the current Earl of Guilford. He is a former member of Parliament where he sat in the House of Lords as had all of his predecessors. He maintains his residence at the family estate, Wroxton Abbey and family seat in in Banbury. Lord North, 10th Earl of

Guilford’s heir apparent is his eldest son, who is named Frederick.

North Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Earl of Guilford). Mottoes— La vertu est la seule noblesse. Animo et fide. Az. a lion pass. or, betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest—A dragon's head erased sa. ducally gorged and chained or. Supporters—Two mastiffs ppr.
2) (Baroness North). (Mildenhall, co. Suffolk, bart., extinct 1695; descended from Sir Henry North, Knt., of Mildenhall, second son of Roger, second Lord North). Az. a lion pass. betw. three fleurs- de-lis or. Supporters—Two dragons, wings elevated sa. ducally gorged and chained or.
3) (co. Cambridge). Per pale or and az. a lion pass. guard. betw. three fleurs-de-lis counterchanged.
4) (co. Hants). Per pale az. and gu. three pheasants close or. Crest—A stag’s head erased ppr. attired or, pierced by an arrow gold, flighted ar. holding in the mouth a slip of olive vert.
5) (Feltham, co. Middlesex). Az. on a chev. ar. betw. three crosses pattée fitchée or, a cinquefoil betw. two escallops gu., on a chief of the third a greyhound courant sa. betw. two pellets. Crest—A cock’s head couped, winged or, each wing charged with two chevronels sa. collared, holding in the beak a branch of holly leaved vert, fructed gu.
6) (Docker, parish of Whittington, co. Lancaster). Quarterly, or and az. in the 1st quarter a crescent of the last. Motto—Animo et fide.
7) (Cubley, co. Derby; granted by Dugdale, Garter, 1676). Az. a lion pass. or, on a chief of the last three fleurs- de-lis of the first. Crest—A swan ppr. gorged with a ducal coronet, and chained gu.
8) (Walkeringham, co. Nottingham, and Huddersfield, co. York; granted 1600). Ar. two chevronels betw. three mullets sa. Crest—A lion's head erased ar. collared vair, or, and az.
9) (Rougham, co. Norfolk). Motto—Animo et fide. Az. a lion pass. or, betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest—A dragon's head erased sa. ducally gorged and chained or.
10) Az. a lion pass. betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar.
11) Az. a lion pass. or, betw. three crowns ar.
12) Sa. a lion pass. or, betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
19. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
20. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
21. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
22. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
23. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
24. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
25. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
26. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
27. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
28. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489