O’Daly Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

O'daly Family Coat of Arms

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O'daly Coat of Arms Meaning

O'daly Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Daly.

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O'daly Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the O’Daly blazon are the hand and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The hand, unless we are told otherwise is a dexter (right) hand shown palm outwards and fingers upwards.10A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305. It demonstrates faith, sincerity and justice, and in the form of two right hands clasped can mean union or alliance11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92. There is a special form called the “Hand of Ulster” which is a sinister hand gules on an argent background (a left hand, red upon white). Originally the Badge of Ulster, the Province of Northern Ireland, it has come to be used as an addition to existing arms, in an escutcheon (small shield) or canton (small square) to indicate that the holder is also a Baronet.12Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 16A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the O'daly Name

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Chiefs of Corea Adhamh, a territory in the present Barony of Maghcradernon, co. Westmeath; descended from and deriving their surname from Dalaigh, Chief of the Sept, claiming dcscent from Niall, of the Nine Hostages; this Sept were scattered after the invasion of 1172). (Finnvara, co. Clare; descended from Donough Mor O'Daly, a famous poet; they removed to Hy Maine temp. Henry VI. and Edward IV., where they acquired property after the revolution of 1688). (Killeleigh, co. Westmeath). Per fess ar. and or, a lion ramp. per fess sa. .and gu. in chief two dexter hands couped at the wrist of the last.
2) (Killymore. co. Galway; now represented by Lord Dunsandle and Clan-Conal. See Daly). Motto—Deo fidelis et regi. Same Arms. Crest—In front of an oak tree ppr. a greyhound courant sa.
3) (Baron Dunsandle and Clan Conal. Lord Dunsandle quarters the following arms: Daly; Power; French; Maxwell; Calderwood; Deniston; Barry; Cantillon). Per fesse ar. and or, a lion ramp. per fesse sa. and gu., in chief two dexter hands couped of the last. Crest—Before an oak tree ppr. a greyhound courant sa. Supporters— Dexter, a lion ramp. as in the arms; sinister, a greyhound ppr. gorged with an Irish or pointed crown, or. Motto—Deo fidelis et regi.
4) (Raford, co. Galway, exemplified 1837, to John Archer Blake, eldest son of the late Andrew William Blake, Esq., of Furbough, co. Galway, on his assuming by royal licence the surname of Daly, in lieu of Blake, in compliance with the will of his maternal grand uncle, Hyacinth Daly, Esq., of Raford). Per fess ar. and or, a lion ramp. per fess sa. and gu. in chief two dexter hands couped at the wrist of the last. Crest—A greyhound courant sa. collared in front of an oak tree ppr. fructed gold.
5) (Melbourne, Australia; the male line of Daly, of Raford, descended from Denis Daly, Esq., of Raford, and Lady Anne de Burgh, his wife, dau. of Michael, 10th Earl of Clanricarde. Hyacinth Daly, Ahthur Disney, Joseph Daly, William John Daly, Anthony Daly, and Annie Eveline Daly, all of Melbourne, are the children of Richard Gore Daly, Esq., of Woodview, co. Galway, and Melbourne, Australia, who was grandson of Michael Daly, Esq., of Mount Pleasant (2nd son of the aforesaid Denis Daly, Esq., of Raford), by the Lady Johanna, his wife, dnu. of Arthur Gore, 1st Earl of Arran). Per fesse ar. and or. a lion ramp, per fesse sa. and gu. in chief two dexter hands couped at the wrists of the last. Crest—In front of an oak tree ppr. fructed or, a greyhound courant sa. Motto—Deo fidelis et Regi.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
10. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92
12. Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
16. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60