Oxley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Oxley Family Coat of Arms

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Oxley Coat of Arms Meaning

Oxley Name Origin & History

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Oxley Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Oxley blazon are the peacock, ox, bell and cross pattee. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The peacock provides an instantly recognisable species, almost always facing the viewer with the full glory of the tail expanded in a pose known as in his pride. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Peacock Wade reckons it the “most beautiful and proudest of birds”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77

Bulls, and their close relations, cows, calves, oxen and the buffalo are relatively recent additions to the art of heraldry (and it is not always possible to distinguish between them in their renderings). 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull They can be found in a variety of poses and may have horns, hooves and collared in a different colour. The writer Guillim noted that the prescence of a bull could signify ”valour and magnanimity”. 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117

The bell usually represents the church bell, which is shown in a realistic, shaded form and may have a clapper of a different colour. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bell In the middle ages Church bells were believed to have the power to disperse evil spirits and to summon guardian angels and we can assume a similar meaning for their depiction in a coat of arms. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P147

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Oxley Name

Oxley Origin:

England

Origin of England:

This unique surname is associated with an Anglo-Saxon origin, and it is also a regional name, acquiring from any of the different areas called, Oxley in Staffordshire, and Ox Lee, near Hepworth in West Yorkshire. The area which is situated in Staffordshire is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Oxelie,” and in the Fees Court Rolls of the Division of 1236, it is listed as “Oxeleg.” All regional names convey similar meanings and parts, which is “the clearing for oxen,” it was acquired in the 7th century from the Olde English word “Oxa,” which means a beast and “leah,” which means a clearance in a woodland, valley. This surname was acquired from the provincial businesspeople, or by the King of the Castle, and in particularly by those old citizens of a region who had migrated from one area to another area, and after settling in a new place they were best recognized by the name of their place of birth. The surname was first listed prior to the 13th Century and previous documentation consists of John de Oxley (1310, Devonshire), and Thomas Oxley (1505, Northamptonshire). Thomas Oxley and Isabel Parkins married at St. Stephan’s, Coleman Street, London, in April 1602.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Yoxley, Oxeley, Oexley, Oaxley, Oxly, O Oxley, Exley, Axley, Oxlee, Uxley.

England:

The name Oxley first originated in Staffordshire where they held a family seat from ancient times, and their first documentation came on the fresh poll provided by the previous King of Britain to decide the rate of taxation of their activities.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert de Oxeleia, which was dated 1227, in the “Feet of Fines of Staffordshire.” It was during the time of King Henry III, who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” 11216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Oxley settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Oxley who settled in the United States in the 17th century included William Oxley settled in New Jersey in 1677. William Oxley landed in New Jersey in 1677.

Some of the people with the name Oxley who settled in the United States in the 18th century included John Oxley, who arrived in Virginia in 1704. Margaret Oxley, who landed in Maryland or Virginia in 1730 and Thomas and Margaret Oxley settled in Maryland in 1731.

Some of the people with the name Oxley who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Elizabeth Oxley her husband Thomas and daughter settled in Portsmouth Virginia in 1820. E. A. Oxley at the age of 40, who settled in America from London, in 1894.

Some of the people with the name Oxley who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Annie Oxley, at the age of 20, who came to America from Sheffield, in 1903. Alfred Oxley, at the age of 8, settled in America from London, in 1905. Alfred Oxley at the age of 42, who shifted to the United States from Glasgow, Scotland, in 1907. Edith Oxley at the age of 23, landed in America from London, England, in 1911. Anna Oxley, at the age of 25, who landed in America from Killucan, Ireland, in 1914.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Oxley who settled in Canada in the 18th century included George Oxley and Mary Oxley both arrived in Nova Scotia in the same year in 1774.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Oxley: United States 5,306; England 6,550; Uruguay 306; Brazil 238; Australia 1,552; Scotland 263; Canada 675; South Africa 822; Germany 269; New Zealand 241.

Notable People:

Adam Oxley was an Australian rules football player.

Alan Oxley was an Australian representative.

Alan Rice-Oxley was a British flying champion during World War I.

Bernard Oxley was an English football player.

Bill Oxley, English professional rugby league football player.

Cyril Oxley was an English football player.

David Oxley was an English artist.

Oxley Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Az. three peacocks’ heads erased or. Crest: Out of a ducal coronet or, a peacock ppr.
2) (Ripon, co. York). Motto—Tam aris quam aratris. Ar. a fess gu. betw. three oxen sa. Crest—An ox's head couped sa. charged with three erm. spots or.
3) (co. York). Ar. on a fess gu. betw. three church bells az. as many crosses pattée of the field.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Peacock
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bell
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P147