Phillip Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Phillip Family Coat of Arms

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Phillip Coat of Arms Meaning

Phillip Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Phillip. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
phillip coat of arms

Phillip Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Phillip blazon are the lion, crescent and mullet. The four main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable, azure and or.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 14A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 19Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 20A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 21The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Phillip Family Gift Ideas

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Phillip Name

Origins of Phillip:
Listed in over one hundred spellings ranging from Philip, Phillip, Filio, Filip, to Filippeli, Filipichov, Phelineux and Khilkov, and appeared in the relevant spellings all over Europe from Spain to the Russian Steppes, this famous surname is of old Greek origins.  It acquires from the word ‘philippos’, a compound made up of two components ‘philein’ meaning ‘to love’, and ‘hippos’, a horse, hence ‘ lover of horses’.  In the great Christian meeting period of the 11th and 12th centuries, a large number of expeditions were launched to ‘free’ the Holy Land and specifically Jerusalem, from the control of the ‘infidel Muslims’.  These teams were lead by the kings of the different participating Christian countries, the most famous being Richard, Coeur de Leon, King of England 1189 – 1199.  Soldiers returning from these ‘Crusades’ took to naming their children after biblical characters or ones associated with Christianity.  In this example, the association shows to be more romantic than actual, since the most famous ‘Philip’ of old times was the father of Alexander, the Great, whose activities were barely Christian.  Even though all Crusader expeditions were ultimately unsuccessful, the biblical names largely replaced the earlier (often) pagan names all over the Europe and formed the root of many new surnames, such as this one.  Early examples of the surname record taken from authentic early European registers include as Wernherus Philippi of Worms in Germany in 1274, and in England in the following year Henry Philip, in the famous charters known as ‘The Hundred Rolls’ for the division of Norfolk.  Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Variations:
More common variations are: Philipp, Phillipe, Phillipo, Phillipi, Phillipa, Philliip, Phillipu, Philliup, Philip.

England:
The surname Phillip first appeared in Normandy (French: Normandie), the old Duchy of Normandy, where they held a family seat as an aristocratic family at Marigny.  Conjecturally, this family may be declined from Phillip, the Count of Namur, but there have been many Kings of this name including Philip I, King of France, King Philip Augustus, Philip the Bold, Philip of Valois, or Philip of France, Duke of Burgundy, and many saints, priests, Dukes, and other nobility and place names.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Phillip landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.  Some of the people with the name Phillip who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Mr Phillip settled in Virginia in 1623.  William Phillip and his son Joseph settled in Pennsylvania in 1682. People with the surname Phillip who landed in the United States in the 18th century included John and Joseph Phillip settled in Philadelphia in 1753 and 1759 respectively. The following century saw more Phillip surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Philip who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Francis Phillip, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1836.  Etienne Phillip, who arrived in Mississippi in 1852.  J. Phillip settled in Texas in 1858.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Phillip who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Edward Phillip arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Navarino” in 1848.  Judge J. Phillip arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Cromwell” in 1849.  James Phillip arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “David Malcolm” in 1849.  Hannah Phillip arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship “Amazon.”

New Zealand:
Some of the population with the surname Phillip who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Thomas Phillip landed in Bay of Islands, New Zealand in 1840.  Henry] Phillip landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840.  Charles Phillip arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Ionic” in 1884.  Arthur Phillip arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Ionic” in 1884.

Phillip Family Gift Ideas

Browse Phillip family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) [Netley, Shropshire, and Picton, Pembrokeshire]. Argent a lion, rampant, sable collared and chained or. Crest: a lion, rampant, as in the Arms.
2) D'azur au chevron d'or acc en chef à dextre d'un croissant d'argent à senestre d'une étoile du même et en pointe d'un cygne aussi d'argent.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
14. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
19. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
20. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
21. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105