Pitchford Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Pitchford Family Coat of Arms

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Pitchford Coat of Arms Meaning

Pitchford Name Origin & History

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Pitchford Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Pitchford blazon are the marlet, cinquefoil and lion passant. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Pitchford Name

Pitchford Origin:

England

Origin of Pitchford:

It is a fascinating and readable surname which originates from an Anglo-Saxon origin, and it is also a locational name acquiring from one of the areas known as “Pickforde,” in Ticehurst, Sussex, or “Pitchford,” in Shropshire. After sometime it was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Piceforde.” In the Shropshire Fees Jury documentations of 1242, it was listed as “Pacford,” which means “an overpass where a pitch could be found.” It acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century word “pic,” the actual form of this word is pitch, which is used here for a rock pitch, along with “Ford,” which means overpass, the real form of the word. In the Sussex area, the word “Pickforde” means “the hog overpass or across,” acquired from the Olde English words “picga,” pig, and “frod,” as prior. Regional names were provided to the King of the castle and to those old residents who migrated from one place to another. One Robert Picford was one of the old migrators to the New World, specifically Barbadoes, he was given a ticket for Virginia in September 1679.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Pitchfoird, Ptchford, Pitchfort, Picchford, Patchford, Batchford, Butchford, Botchford.

England:

The surname Pitchford first appeared in Shropshire at Pitchford, a small hamlet, and church, in the time of Atcham, the hamlet derives its name from the hard adhesive fragrance that comes from the oily material that covers up the whole surface of the water. So the area means “overpass near a region where pitch if appeared.” It is associated with the Ancient English words “pic” and “Ford.” The Domesday Book of 1086 records the areas as Piceforde and is also registered as Pitchford Chamber as “Edric, and Leofric and Wulfric guarded it as three castles, they were unbound.” Today Pitchford Chamber is on a large Level I recorded Tudor country house that is mostly redeveloped. Areas of the Roman Watling Street runs all over the grounds. Previous documentations lists that Geoffrey de Pykeford, a warrior, was king of the castle since 1272. He also created the civil parish of St Michael, which consists of a wood statue of him.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John de Picford, which was dated 1273, in the “Shropshire Hundred Rolls.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Pitchford settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Pitchford who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Eliza Pitchford and Joseph Pitchford both arrived in Virginia in the same year in 1702.

Some of the people with the name Pitchford who settled in the United States in the 19th century included David Pitchford, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1877.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Pitchford: United States 4,613; England 1,651; Wales 79; Australia 258; Scotland 20; Canada 162; South Africa 457; Germany 134; New Zealand 43; Spain 15.

Notable People:

Randall S. “Randy” Pitchford II was born in April 1971. He is one of the creators of video game house Gearbox Software and currently the CEO and administrator of the company.

Liam Pitchford was born in July 1993. He is a British player in table tennis. As of August 2016, he is graded as the no. 48 player in the world.

Walter Pitchford V was born in April 1992. He is an American professional basketball player. He played college basketball at Florida and Nebraska before playing for the Raptors in 2015.

Sir Christopher John Pitchford was born in March 1947. He is a great British justice, recently senior Justice of Appeal in England and Wales.

Dean Pitchford was born in July 1951, Honolulu, Hawaii. He is an American composer, scripter, producer, actor, and novel writer.

Stephen “Steve” Pitchford was an English professional rugby league football player.

Max Pitchford (June 1903 – July 1968) was an old Australian rules football player who played with North Melbourne in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Pitchford Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Lee Brockhurst, co. Salop; allowed at the Visit. 1584). Az. a cinquefoil betw. six martlets or. Crest—An ostrich ar. beaked and ducally crowned or.
2) (Pitchford, co. Salop; descended from Ranulph de Pycheford, temp. Henry I.). Or, a lion pass. az. armed and langued gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61