Rayner Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rayner Family Coat of Arms

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Rayner Coat of Arms Meaning

Rayner Name Origin & History

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Rayner Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Rayner blazon are the estoile, saltire, cross crosslet and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, gules and argent .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77

The saltire is one the major ordinaries, large charges that occupy the whole of the field 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire. Arguably one of the best uses of this device is that of the St. Andrews Cross, a white saltire on a blue background found on the Scottish flag. The saltire is obviously closely related to the Cross, and Wade in his work on Heraldic Symbology suggests additionally that it alludes to “Resolution”, whilst Guillim, an even more ancient writer, somewhat fancifully argues that it is awarded to those who have succesfully scaled the walls of towns! 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rayner Name

Rayner Origin:

England

Origin of Rayner:

This unique surname is of old English origin, and derives from the ancient Norman French male name “Rainer” or “Re(i)ner.” It appears from the Old German word “Raginhari,” a combination of the components “ragin,” which means guidance, and “hari,” which means army. This name developed into England by the Normans after the invasion of 1066 and appears in its Latinized form as “Rainerus” in the Domesday Book of 1086. One, Reynerus cancellarius was listed in the Records of St. Benet of Holme, Norfolk, dated 1101, and a Ricardus filius (son of) Rainer in the 1148 Winton Rolls of Hampshire. Later in 7th Century Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse names frequently were made of a unique combination whose elements usually related to the Lords of Fire, Water, and War, or a compound of different components. Later examples of the surname consist of Alexander Reygner in London in 1229, William Reyner in Staffordshire in 1286 and Anabilla Rayner in Yorkshire in 1379. Wassell Rayner, a first traveler to the New World, showed on a list of those inhabitants in Virginia in February 1623.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Rayaner, Rayoner, Raynera, Rayneri, Raynner, Rayiner, Raynerr, Rayneer, Ryner, Raner.

England:

The surname Rayner first originated in Herefordshire. The name was first listed as Raynerus, a resident in chief in the Domesday Book of 1086. After some year Reynerus cancellarius was recorded in Norfolk in 1101 – 1125 and Ricardus filius Rainer was recorded at Winton in Hampshire in 1148. The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 recorded the name as a particular name as Reyner le Blak in Norfolk and Reyner Custance in Norfolk. The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 record Anabilla Rayner and Thomas Rayner.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of William Rayner, which was dated 1216, in “Transcripts of Charters relating to the Gilbertine Houses,” Lincolnshire. It was during the time of King Henry III, who was known to be “The Frenchman,” 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this time became a basic requirement for the derivation of personal taxation.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Rayner settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Rayner who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Mrs. Adam Rayner, who landed in Virginia in 1622. Joan Rayner settled in Virginia in 1623 with her husband. Joane Rayner, who landed in Virginia in 1624 – 1625. Wassell Rayner, who arrived in Jamestown, Va in 1624. Thurston Rayner at the age of 13, landed in New England in 1634.

Some of the people with the name Rayner who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Christian Rayner, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1763.

Some of the individuals with the name Rayner who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Augustin Rayner, who arrived in New York in 1826.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Rayner who settled in Australia in the 19th century included John Rayner, who transferred aboard the ‘Asia’ in July 1823, arriving in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. William Rayner at the age of 52 landed in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “William Money.” Samuel Rayner came in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Spartan” in 1849. William Rayner at the age of 54 and Emily Rayner at the age of 19, both settled in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “William Money” in the same year in 1849.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Rayner who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Rayner landed in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Whitby” in 1841. Mary Rayner at the age of 27 and William Rayner, at the age of 1, both settled in Nelson aboard the ship “Lloyds” in the same year in 1842. William Rayner at the age of 17 came in Nelson aboard the ship ‘Mary Ann” in 1842. C.F. Rayner came to Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Alma” in 1857.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ryner: United States 4,849; England 11,696; Scotland 361; Australia 5,808; Malaysia 1,062; Canada 2,363; South Africa 2,046; Wales 429; New Zealand 1,018; Brazil 731.

Notable People:

Eddie Rayner (born 1952), was a New Zealand singer.

Henry Rayner (1902–1957), was an Australian and British entertainer.

Isidor Rayner (1850–1912), was an American politician.

Jack Rayner (1921–2008), was an Australian player in the rugby league.

Jacqueline Rayner was a British writer and television author.

Jay Rayner (born 1966), was a British scholar and author.

Rayner Family Gift Ideas

Browse Rayner family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (East Drayton, co. Nottingham). Ermine on a chief indented azure two estoiles or.
2) Gules a saltire engrailed ermine
3) Gules a saltire engrailed or in chief three estoiles of the second pierced sable.
4) Argent three fleurs-de-lis (another, roses) between eight crosses crosslet gules.
5) Azure a fret sable a bend chequy or and gules.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103