Rochester Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rochester Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Rochester Coat of Arms Meaning

Rochester Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Rochester. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

rochester coat of arms

Rochester Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Rochester blazon are the chequy, escallop, crescent and fesse. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, argent and gules .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Rochester Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rochester Name

Rochester Origin:

England

Origin of Rochester:

The origin of this surname evolved originally from Anglo-Saxon and is a locational surname deriving from the town in Kent named as Rochester, or, in some examples, from a much smaller area in Northumberland with a similar name. The area in Kent is an old area, listed by the Venerable Bede in about the year 730 in both its actual British name and the pre Roman name of “Dorubrevi,” a combination of the components “duro,” which means castle, and “briva,” which mean bridge or overpass. In its Anglo-Saxon type as “Hrofaecasetre,” a combination of the Old English pre 7th Century word “hrof,” which means covering, and “caester,” which means Roman castle. The area is listed in the Domesday Book of the year 1086 as “Rovecestre.” Rochester in Northumberland was considered to have hailed from the region in Kent, or the first component probably the ancient English word “hroc,” which means cheat or deceive. The new versions of this surname from these origins can found in Rochester, Register, and Rossiter. The wedding of Thomas Rochester and Elizabethe Starkey listed in St. Michael’s, Cornhill, London, in May 1549.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Rowchester, Roechester, Roochester, Rochestery, Rhochester, Rocheester, Rechester, Richester, Rachester, Rochaster.

England:

The surname Rochester was first organized in Kent where the name was first listed by Bede under the names of Dorubrevi and Hrofoecoestre. The first reference represents to the Briton name that was acquired from “duro” which means “castle” or “overpass” while the second origin obtained from the Ancient English word for “cover.” Today Rochester is a town in Kent which sometimes dates back to pre-43 AD, called Durobrivae by the Romans. Rochester palace stands on the grounds that has been protected since the Roman invasion. Rochester is also a small hamlet in Northumberland and Staffordshire. “This church, anciently named as Rocetter, or Roucestre, consists about 2370 acres.”

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Turoldus de Rouecestra, which was dated 1086, The Domesday Book, (Essex). It was during the time of King William I, who was known to be “The Conqueror,” 1066 – 1087. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Rochester settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Rochester who settled in the United States in the 17th century included John Rochester arrived in Virginia in 1638. Jon Rochester who settled in Virginia in 1638. Richard Rochester, who landed in Maryland in 1973. Elizabeth Rochester came to Maryland in 1677.

Some of the people with the name Rochester who settled in the United States in the 18th century included William Rochester, who arrived in Virginia in 1703.

Some of the individuals with the name Rochester who settled in the United States in the 19th century included W B Rochester, who settled in San Francisco, California in 1851.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Rochester who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Rochester at the age of 26 landed in Wellington, aboard the ship “Hurunui” in 1877.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Rochester: United States 4,779; England 1,694; Brazil 270; Germany 168; Australia 511; Jamaica 1,124; Canada 261; South Africa 183; Philippines 258; Mexico 183.

Notable People:

Ajay Rochester (born 1969), was an Australian entertainer and writer. He was born in the year 1969.

Anna Rochester (1880-1966), was an American worker and socialist politician.

George Rochester (1908–2001), was an English analyst.

Nathaniel Rochester (1752–1831), was an American Revolutionary War fighter and land philosopher, builder of Rochester, New York.

Nathaniel Rochester (1919–2001) was a computer expert, developed the IBM 701.

Paul Rochester (born 1938), was an American football player. He was born in the year 1938.

Robert Rochester (about 1494 – 1557), English Roman liberal and worker of Queen Mary I.

Thomas H. Rochester (1797–1874), was the 6th son of Colonel Nathaniel Rochester and the 6th officer of Rochester.

William B. Rochester (1789–1838), was an American advocate and leader from New York.

Rochester Family Gift Ideas

Browse Rochester family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More rochester Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Loys Hall, Terling, co. Essex, and co. Sussex). Chequy ar. and gu. on a fess vert three escallops or. Crest—A cubit arm in armour erect issuing from clouds ppr. holding in the gauntlet a marigold, a rose, and a pomegranate all ppr. leaved vert, and environed with a ducal coronet or.
2) (co. Essex). Or, a fess betw. three crescents sa. Crest—A crane ar.
3) (Sir Robert Rochester, K.G., elected 23 April, 1557, d. 28 Nov. following, without being installed). Chequy ar. and gu. on a fess az. three escallops or. Same Crest as the last.
4) Ar. a fess betw. three crescents sa.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106