Roebuck Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Roebuck Family Coat of Arms

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Roebuck Coat of Arms Meaning

Roebuck Name Origin & History

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Roebuck Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Roebuck blazon are the mascle, fleur-de-lis and stork. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, azure and gules .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The mascle is a close relative of the lozenge or diamond shape, but with the centre cut away revealing the background underneath. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle. Guillim, writing in the 17th century reckoned the mascle to represent the mesh of a net, being the biblical symbol for “persuasion, whereby men are induced to virtue and verity”. 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The crane, heron and stork are commonly to be found on a coat of arms but all tend to share the same stylised appearance 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164. Guillim reckons the stork to the “emblem of filial duty” and also the “symbol of a grateful man”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Roebuck Name

Roebuck Origin:

England

Origin of Roebuck:

This interesting and unique name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and has two distinct origins. The first origin of the surname can derive from a name for a nervous person, from the Ancient English pre 7th Century “ra” and “bucc”, roe-buck. Several surnames evolved from the perpetual use of the nickname, which was regularly used with relation to some visualized comparison to an animal, bird or unique behavior. Other fashionable surnames acquired from the Olde English “ra” and “raege” (female deer), are Ray, Roe, Raye, Reye and Rae. The progress of “Roebuck” as a surname contains Matilda Robuc (1297, Yorkshire), and Richard Rabuk (1379, ibid). The modern surname might also acquire from a “sign-name” where the authentic bearers lived “at the sign of the Roebuck” as in one William atte Robuck, listed in Parliamentary scripts of 1313. One John Roebuck was named at St. Andrew’s, Holborn, in London, on 11th May 1639.

Variations:

Some common variations are: Roebouck, Rhoebuck, Robuck, Rebuck, Roebuk, Roebuc, Rowbuck, Roeback, Roebeck, Reybuck.

England:

The surname Roebuck originated in Kent where they held a family seat from ancient times, and their first documentation came on the early census rolls appropriated by the early Lords of Britain to regulate the rate of taxation of their subjects.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Adam Rebuck (witness), dated 1246, assistant in the “Assize Rolls of Lancashire”. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Roebuck settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Roebuck who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Roebuck, who landed in Maryland in 1674.

Some of the people with the name Roebuck who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Jarvis Roebuck, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1745.

Some of the people with the name Roebuck who settled in the United States in the 19th century included John Wood Roebuck, who arrived in America in 1806. Benjamin Disney Roebuck, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1808. John, John Wood, Nathan and William Roebuck all arrived in Philadelphia between 1805 – 1876 in the 19th Century.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Roebuck who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Luke Roebuck U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, Nova Scotia on 26th October 1783 was passenger number 234 aboard the ship “HMS Clinton”, picked up on 28 September 1783 at Staten Island, New York, USA.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Roebuck who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Joseph Roebuck, an English prisoner from Middlesex, who was shifted aboard the ship “Argyle” on 5th March 1831 and arriving in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. John Roebuck who was also an English prisoner from York, who was migrated aboard the “Anson” on 23th September 1843, coming in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. Ellen Roebuck who was a servant at the age of 17 arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship “Stamboul”.

New-Zealand:

The settlement of people of the surname Roebuck also occured in places in New-Zealand in the 19th Century. Charles Roebuck at the age of 35, Elizabeth Roebuck, aged 30, Elizabeth Roebuck at the age of 14, George Palmer Roebuck, aged 10 and Mary Ann Roebuck at the age of 3 years all these people arrived in Nelson aboard the ship “Bombay” in 1842.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Roebuck: United States 5,718; England 2,517; Scotland 249; Australia 648; New Zealand 189; Canada 512; South Africa 584; Wales 102; Puerto Rico 68; United States Virgin Island 54.

NOTABLE PEOPLE:

Alvah C. Roebuck (1864–1948), was an American businessman and co-creator of Sears, Roebuck, and Company.

Daniel Roebuck (born 1963), is an American television film artist, an author, and director.

Gene Roebuck (born 1947), was an American college sports trainer.

Henry Disney Roebuck was a founder of Midford Palace.

John Arthur Roebuck (1802–1879), was a British politician.

Joseph Roebuck (born 1985), is an English swimmer.

Marty Roebuck (born 1965), is an old Australian football player.

Roebuck Family Gift Ideas

Browse Roebuck family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Ingress, co. Kent). Ar. a fess quarterly az. and gu. betw. three mascles sa. Crest—A stork ar. beaked and membered gu.
2) (co. Somerset). Ar. on a fess gu. three fleurs-de-lis or. Crest—A lion pass. guard. gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78