Roll Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Roll Family Coat of Arms

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Roll Coat of Arms Meaning

Roll Name Origin & History

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Roll Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Roll blazon are the fesse dancette, billet and lion. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. This created an opportunity to add decorative edging to the band, of many forms, and to very pleasing artisitic effect, at least close up – it must be admitted that at distance some of the forms are hard to distinguish! Dancettee (sometimes spelled dancetty or dancy) is a bold, zig-zag pattern, perhaps the most distinctive of the patterned edges. Purists might argue that the French variant denché Is not the same, being of larger size and with the points being 90º, but there is much variation in actual practice so the difference is perhaps not that meaningful.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the billet is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. In form it is a simple rectangle though sometimes has a slightly rounded or ragged appearance to reflect one possible origin as a block of wood cut by an axe. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Billet. Wade groups the billet with the other square charges as symbols of “honesty and constancy”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P95

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 13A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Roll Name

Roll Origin:

England, Garmany

Origins of Roll:

It is an ancient English surname which with the addition of ‘s’ as a nickname meaning ‘son of’. This name has two possible origins. The first origin is from 11th century Norman-French and the second origin is before the 6th century from a German male name Roul or Rolf. The latter origin of the names lies in the medieval name ‘Hrolf’, combine elements of the components “hrod” which mean fame and honor, and “wulf,” a wolf. This name considers to brought to England by two independent sources. It was very famous during the invasion of Normans in the year 1066, but perhaps it could have been popularized as well by the earlier Scandanavians known to history as “The Vikings.” The surname was first brought in like many others, in the 13th century. Early examples of more recordings are Robert Roll in the Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire in the year 1279 and Matilda Rolles in the Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire for the same year.

Variations:

More common variations are: Rollo, Rolle, Rolly, Rolla, Roell, Rolli, Rollu, Rholl, Roull, Roill.

England:

The origins of the surname Roll was in Yorkshire where they were undertenants in the dignity of Richmond, declined from the famous Norman family of Rollos of Roullours in Calvados, arrondisement of Dieppe, in Normandy. After a century it arises that William de Rollos, King of Bourne in the division of Lincoln to the South, was also a descendant of this famous family. Richard Rolle was an English spiritual author, Bible translator, and solitary man. He is also known as Richard Rolle of Hampole or de Hampole. He was educated at Oxford University.

Other forms of the name contain Row, Rowes, Rowe, and Rolfes, while according to the later recordings from the chapel records of the city of London contain John Rowles married Agnet Fetherstone in November 1541, at St. Stephen Walbrook, and Mary Roll who was named at St. Andrew’s Holborn on April 4 1575. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States:

People with the surname Roll settled in the United States in different centuries. Some of the people of Roll family who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Christoph Roll and Jorg William Roll landed in New Jersey and New York in the same year, 1709. Jacob Roll and Johannes Roll would also settle in Pennsylvania in the same year 1754 as well as John Roll, at the age of 22 arrived in Maryland in the year 1774.

The following century saw more people with the Roll surname arrive. People who arrived in the 19th century included Jean-Louis Roll arrived in Pennsylvania in 1830. Heinrich Roll, at the age of 34 in Missouri in the year 1840. Andrew Roll landed in Allegany Division, Pennsylvania in 1846. Ann Maria Roll, at the age of 24 and Catherine, aged 46 landed in New York, NY in the year 1848.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Roll: United States 6,323; England 570; South Africa 530; Brazil 874; Germany 3,967; France 796; Russia 727; Israel 448; Norway 367; Philippines 709.

Notable People:

Alfred Philippe Roll (1846–1919), was a French painter and interior decorator.

Bob Roll (1960), was an American professional cyclist reporter and announcer

Eric Roll (1907–2005), was an academic and professional economist or businessperson, public servant and banker or manager.

Ferdinand Nicolai Roll (1831–1921), was a Norwegian barrister and politics man or lawmaker. He played a major role in the field of politics.

John Roll (1947–2011), was a United States judge.

Michael Roll (1961), was a German television actor and artist.

Michael Roll (1946), was a British pianist.

Michael Roll (1987), was an American basketball player.

Richard Roll (1939), was an American businessman.

Sigurd Roll (1893–1944), was a Norwegian diplomat and sportsman.

Stephan Roll (1904-1974), was a Romanian poetry writer.

William G. Roll (1926), was an American psychologist and parapsychologist.

Thomas Roll (1977), was a retired Danish professional football player.

Roll Family Gift Ideas

Browse Roll family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Stevenston, co. Devon; one of the ancient families treated of by Prince, in his "Worthies of co. Devon;" Sir Henry Rolle, Knt., of Stevenston, 6. 1540, aged 75 at Visit. Devon, 1620, was son of John Rolle, Esq., of same place). Or, on a fess dancettee between three billets azure each charged with a lion ramp, of the field, as many bezants. Crest—A cubit arm erect vested or, charged with a fess indented double cotised gold, in the hand a flint stone proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Billet
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P95
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
13. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60