Smith Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Smith Family Coat of Arms

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Smith Coat of Arms Meaning

Smith Name Origin & History

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Smith Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Smith blazon are the mullet, anvil, martlet and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, gules and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

It is important that a coat of arms be easily recognised and so everyday objects were frequently used as clearly identifiable charges – tools 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69 being a common and important example of these, of which the anvil is typical and for meaning we need look no further than the craft of the blacksmith, with which the named family is likely to have been associated with. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P98 In representation it is drawn in a realistic fashion, one of the few heraldic items to be shown with a certain amount of perspective. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Anvil

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Smith Name

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

"214) (Damagh, co. Kilkenny; granted by Preston, Ulster, 1635, to William Smith, Esq., of Damagh, Secretary to James, Earl of Ormonde, and allowed to WilliamSmith's grandson, Valentine Smith, also of Damagh, 6 August, 1691. The original Patent recites that the Earl of Ormonde was ""well pleased that William Smith, of Damagh, co. Kilkenny, should bear some parcell of his arms for a perpetual memory of ye worthy, faithful, and diligent service done by him to the said earle,'' and the subsequent confirmation by Carney, Ulster, 6 Aug. 1691, is founded on the foregoing patent, and on the following attestation of the Duke of Ormonde: ""I, James, Duke, Marquies, and Earle of Ormond, &c., at ye request of my servant Valentine Smith, doe hereby certifie yt William Smith, late of Damagh, in ye county of Killkeny, somtime my secretary,was brought out of England to my service, and yt his eldest son, Lawrance Smith, was slaine in his Maties. King Charles his service, in ye seige of Droghedah, being there Capt. of a foote company in Coll. Varneyes Rigament. I further certifie yt ye sd. William Smith, the sd. Lawrance Smith, and his son Valentine Smith aforesd., dureing their service to me above threescore yeares past have constantly demeaned themselves with grate integrity, trust, and ffidelity to my service and interest, of which I have had sufficient experience, and therefore I doe recommend ye sd
Valentine to my successor as a ffaithfull person to be imployed as occation shall require that ye said Valentine and his
ffamily having deserved my flavor in this behalfe. Witness my hand and scale at Dublin, ye 12th of March, 1684""). Gu. betw. two falcons' wings conjoined and displ. ar. a pile erm. charged with a chief indented az. Crest—A dove close bearing an olive branch both ppr. gorged with a bar gemel or, beaked and legged gu."
215) (Maine, co. Louth; registered in Ulster’s Office, 1704; the heiress m. Нugh Stafford, Esq.). (Annsbrook, co. Meath, a branch of Smith, of Maine; confirmed by Betham, Ulster, to Henry Smith, Esq., J.P. and D.L., of Annsbrook). Motto—Delectat amor patriæ. (Beabeg, co. Meath). (Greenhills, co. Louth). (Admiral Edward Tyrrell Smith, descended from Tenison Smith, fourth son of Jeremiah Smith, Esq., of Maine). Ar. on a bend betw. two bulls’ heads erased az. armed or, three lozenges of the last. Crest—A demi bull salient az. armed and unguled or.
216) (confirmed by Roberts, Ulster, 1646, to William Smith, then Mayor of Dublin for the fifth successive year, and Colonel of a regiment of foot within the city; descended from an ancient family of that name formerly settled in co. York, who afterwards removed into co. Suffolk). Ar. on a bend betw. two unicorns’ heads erased az. three lozenges or, on a canton sa. a castle of the first. Crest—A bull’s head couped sa. attired or.
217) (impalement Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1616, Mary Smith, m. first, Henry Usher, Lord Primate of Ireland, d. 1613; and secondly, William, second son of Richard Fitzwilliam, Esq., of Merrion, d. 1616). Or, two bars wavy sa. on a chief ar. a demi lion ramp. of the second, armed and langued gu.
218) (impalement Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1659). Az. two bars nebulée crm. on a chief or, a demi lion issuant sa.
219) (Dublin; granted by St. George, Ulster, 1677, to Alderman John Smith, then Lord Mayor of Dublin). Ar. on a fess gu. betw. three peacocks in their pride ppr. a tower of the first enclosed by two bezants. Crest—A demi peacock in his pride ppr. charged on the breast with a trefoil or.
220) (confirmed by Carney, Principal Herald of Ireland during Oliver Cromwell's usurpation, afterwards Ulster King of Arms, to Lewis Smith, Surveyor In Ireland, descended from co. York). (registered to Sir Francis William Smith, M.D., Surgeon in Ordinary to the Earl of Mulgrare, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, knighted 1837). Ar. on a bend az. betw. two unicorns' heads couped gu. three lozenges or. Crest—A unicorn’s head couped sa.
221) (Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1670, Mrs. Chedle, alias Smith). Per chev. gu. and az. three leopards' heads erased and affrontée ar.
222) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, Sir Samuel Smith, Knt., buried at St. Bride's Dublin, 30 Aug. 1635). (Violetstown, co. Westmeath). Per chev. az. and gu. three leopards’ heads erased ar. spotted sa. Crest—A leopard's head, as in the arms.
223) (Maurice Smith, Clerk of His Majesty’s Ordnance in Ireland; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1640). Gu. three mullets pierced or, on a chief of the last as many pellets.
224) (Clerk of the Ordnance, Ireland; Reg. Ulster’s Office). (Baskin, co. Dublin; Henry Smith, Esq., of that place, d. 1653). Gu. three mullets pierced or, on a chief sa. as many bezants. Crest—Two battle axes in saltire gu. headed or.
225) (granted by Betham, Ulster, to Rev. George Sidney Smith, A.M., Fellow Trin. Coll. Dublin). Motto—Pret. Quarterly, gu. and az. over all a cross or, charged with a pheon az. betw. four roses gu. seeded of the third, barbed vert. Crest—A horse’s head couped sa. bridled and double reined ar. bitted or.
226) (borne by Captain Robert Smith, of the family of Smith of Dirleton, co. Haddington, formerly of the 44th Regiment, now Athlone Pursuivant-of-Arms, and quarterly with Soden by his only son, Robert Soden Smith Esq., M.A., F.S.A., of the South Kensington Museum). Motto—Ex usu commodum. Ar. on a saltire az. betw. three crescents, one in chief and two in the flanks gu. and a chessrook in base sa. a garb of the first. Crest—A naked arm couped below the elbow erect holding a writing quill all ppr.
227) (Reg. Ulster’s Office). Sa. a pile erm. betw. two wings coiyoined in base or, a chief indented of the last.
228) Sa. on a chev. engr. betw. six crosses crosslet fitchée or, three fleurs-de-lis az.
229) Ar. three pellets.
230) Gu. on a chev. engr. or, three crosses crosslet fitchée sa.
231) Sa. six billets erm. three, two, and one.
232) Ar. on a bend vert six daggers saltirewise of the first. Crest—On a ducal coronet vert two swords in saltire ar. hilts or.
233) (quartered by Sargent). Or, a chev. cotised betw. three demi griffins segreant reguard. sa.
234) (John Smith, Bishop of Llandaff, 1476 to 1478). Az. a saltire erm. betw. four fleurs-de-lis ar.
235) Ar. two pales az. each charged with three fleurs- de-lis of the first, on a chief of the second alion pass. of the field. Crest—Two arms couped above the elbows ppr. holding a sword in both hands crossways ar. pommelled or.
236) Gu. a cinquefoil or, on a border az. eight horseshoes of the second.
237) Gu. a bull's head cabossed within two bars gemel wavy ar. betw. two mullets in chief and in base a griffin pass. or.
238) Or, on a fess engr. gu. betw. three martlets sa. as many crosses pattée of the first.
239) Per fess embattled erm. and gu. three crescents counterchanged, debruised by a dexter bendlet or. Crest- On a mural crown gu. an owl ar.
240) Az. two bars wavy ar. on a chief or, a demi lion ramp. issuant sa. bezantée.
241) Ar. two chev. sa. on each three fleurs-de-lis or, on a chief az. a lion pass. of the third, on the shoulder a lozenge gu. Crest—A hand ppr. habited chequy ar. and az. holding three arrows, two in saltire and one in pale or, feathered and headed ar.
242) Ar. three greyhounds courant in pale sa. collared or, betw. ten crosses pattée fltchée of the second. Crest—A dragon's head erased or, pellettée.
243) Or, three bars sa. in chief as many crosses pattée fitchée of the second. Crest—On a mount vert a talbot sejant erm. collared gu.
244) Ar. a chev. betw. three roses sa.
245) Sa. six fleurs-de-lis or, three and three.
246) Ar. a lion pass. reguard. ppr.
247) Ar. a lion pass. reguard. ppr.
248) Ar. on a mount vert a wolf pass. gu.
249) Vert on a chev. betw. three mallets or, an eagle displ. sa.
250) Barry wavy of six ar. and az. on a chief gu. three barnacles or.
251) Sa. on a fess dancettee ar. five billets of the first.
252) Erm. two chev. sa. on each three fleurs-do lis or.
253) Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three catharine wheel gu.
254) Az. (another, sa.) a bend ar. betw. seven billets or, four and three.
255) (alias Banger). Gu. a chev. betw. three leopards’ faces or, a chief erm.
256) Gu. on a chev. betw. three birds ar. as many leopards' faces of the field.
257) Az. two chev. ar. each charged with five fleurs- de-lis gu. on a chief of the second a lion pass. of the field.
258) Gu. two tilting-spears in saltire ar. betw. four castles or.
259) Az. a chev. or, betw. ten cinquefoils, six above and four below, of the last.
260) Ar. two bars gu. in chief three cinquefoils az.
261) Per pale ar. and az. a fess counterchanged.
262) Sa. a bend ar. betw. seven billets or.
263) (quartered by Viell, of co. Devon). Sa. on a bend or, three billets of the field.
264) Or, two bendlets engr. erm.
265) Ar. a chev. sa. on a chief of the second three leopards’ faces or.
266) Az. a chev. betw. three lions pass. guard. or. Crest—A leopard’s head erased ar. spotted sa. collared, lined, and ringed or.
267) Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three greyhounds’ heads erased sa. as many estoiles or. Crest—A stag’s head erased gu.
268) Ar. a saltire az. betw. three crescents gu. and a millrind in base of the second. Crest—A dexter arm holding a pen ppr.
269) Az. three bezants. Crest— A plume of five feathers.
270) Per chev. or and gu. in chief two fleurs-de-lis and in base an estoile all counterchanged. Crest—Out of a mural coronet ppr. an ostrich’s head ar.
271) Sa. on a chev. ar. betw. three griffins’ heads erased or, a boar’s head couped enclosed by two pheons gu. Crest—An eagle’s head or, depressed with two bends vert, winged, one ar. the other sa. beaked gu.
272) Ar. on a chev. cotised betw. three crosses pattée gu. as many martlets or.
273) Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three crosses botonnée sa.
274) Ar. a chev. betw. three griffins’ heads couped sa.
275) (alias Boynton) Or, on a fess betw. three crescents gu. a lion pass. ar. all within a border engr. az. bezantée. Crest—A goat statant sa. guttée d’eau, horned, maned, and murally (or ducally) gorged ar.
276) Ar. an eagle displ. sa. armed gu.
277) Gu. a lion ramp. or, on a chief of the last a mullet of the field betw. two hurts. Crest—A lion’s head erased or.
278) Ar. two bars gu. each charged with three fleurs-de-lis or, on a chief az. a lion pass. of the first.
279) Az. a cup or, with flames issuant ppr. betw. two chessrooks of the second, on a chief ar. bordured of the same three boars’ heads erased barwise of the first.
280) Sa. on a fess dancettée ar. seven billets of the field. Crest—A salamander couchant reguard. ducally gorged in flames ppr.
281) Az. semée of crosses crosslet fitchée three fleurs-de-lis ar. a border engr. or.
282) Ar. a bend az. betw. three mullets gu.
283) Ar. three fleurs-de-lis in fess gu. betw. nine crosses crosslet, five in chief and four in base sa. Crest—A fleur-de-lis ar. charged with a cross crosslet sa.
284) (London). Or, on a chev. gu. betw. three tigers' faces gu. as many suns ppr.
285) (Benjamin Brwon Smith, Esq., of Wolverhampton, co. Stafford). Barry of six ar gutte de poix and gu. a lion ramp. ducally crowned sa. holding betw. the paws a pheon or, betw. four pheons, two in chief and two in base of the last. Crest—An heraldic tiger ar. vulned in the neck ppr. charged on the budy with two pheons and resting the dexter foreleg on a pheon gu.
286) (Rev. Jeremiah Finch Smith, Rector of Aldridge, co. Stafford, M.A., F.S.A.). Motto: Doctrina ferro perenniur. Barry of six erm. and gu. a lion ramp. sa. on the head a crown vallary holding betw. the paws an annulet or, betw. three passion crosses of the last. Crest—A lion ramp. sa. crowned as in the arms holding betw. the fore-paws a passion cross and the dexter hind-paw resting on an annulet or.
287) (Rev. Joseph Denham Smith, of St. Marylebone, Middlesex, and Vesey Place, Dublin). Or, a lozenge az. charged with a mullet of six points of the first betw. three dragons’ heads erased of the second, all within a bordure of the last charged with eleven bezants. Crest—A dragon’s head erased az. charged with a mullet of six points and collared flory counter flory or, pierced through the mouth by an arrow fessewise, the point to the dexter ppr.
288) (Ryhope, co. Durham. The heiress m. Grey, now represented by George John Scurfield, formerly Grey, Esq., of Hurworth, co. Durham). Ar. on a bend betw. two unicorns’ heads erased az. three bezants.
289) (or Smyth). (London). Ar. a fret sa. on a chief of the second a lion pass. guard. of the first.
290) (or Smyth). (Annas, co. Lincoln). (Little Houghton, co. Northampton). Per bend indented or and az. two crosses moline counterchanged. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi falcon volant ppr. , wings expanded ar.
291) (or Smyth). (quartered by Richards). Or, on a fess engr. gu. betw. six martlets sa. three crosses crosslet of the field.
292) (or Smythe). (Nunstainton, co. Durham, and Langley, co. Salop). (Eshe Hall, co. Durham; also of Acton Burnell, co. Salop, and Wooton Hall, co. Warwick, bart.). (Nunstainton, co. Durham, and Langley, co. Salop). Sa. three roses ar. barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—A stag’s head erased gorged with a wreath of laurel all ppr. Motto—Regi semper fidelis.
293) (or Smythe). (Boughton Monchelsea, co. Kent; granted, 14 Sept. 1605, to Simon Smythe, Esq., of that place, and now borne by Clement Taylor Smythe, Esq., of Maidstone). (Lested Lodge, in Chart, next Sutton-Valence, and Maidstone, all in co. Kent). Or, three bars sa. in chief as many crosses formée fitchée of thr second. Crest—On a mount vert a talbot sejant erm. eared and collared sa. ringed or, on the dexter side of the mount a branch of laurel of the fiist.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P98
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Anvil
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79