Stamps Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Stamps Family Coat of Arms

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Stamps Coat of Arms Meaning

Stamps Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Stampe.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Stamps. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Stamps Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Stamps blazon are the horse, swan, ducal coronet and fesse. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? Nevertheless, real animals 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 are perhaps one of the most common sights on coats of arms, especially animals of European origin. The horse Is a typical example of these.

Wade suggests that the appearance of a swan in a coat of arms is perhaps an indication of a musical person, or a “ lover of poetry and harmony”. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78 It is generally shown in a lifelike aspect and colouring, although it may be leaked and legged with other colours. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan. It is a popular charge, both on the shield itself and impress, sometimes sitting and sometimes rising as if about to take off in flight. 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245

Crowns are frequently observed in Heraldry 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184, but we should not make the mistake of assuming that these are always on Royal arms 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138. Many of the orders of nobility across Europe were entitled to wear crowns and coronets, Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons in England each had their own distinctive headwear 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350. The ducal coronet is an example of this, being gold with a brim of strawberry leaves and a cap of crimson velvet. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Crown It may also be the case that a crown is added to an existing coat of arms as an augmentation in recognition of some service to a King 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Stamps Name

It is a French locational name which started in the hamlet of “Etampes” in the Department of Seine et Oise, Normandy.  The name noted very early in London and may relate to the actual Invasion of 1066.  In the old period, the word “Stamp” also given to a worker at the Mint, one who Struck or Stamped Coins and some name holders will derive from this source. The first recording of the surname was in the late 12th Century.  One Thomas Stampe shows in the Feet of Fines for Essex, 1424. More common variations are: Stampes, Stampas, Stameps, Stomps, Stimps, Stemps, Satmps, Stambs, Stumpus.

The surname Stamps first appeared in Berkshire, but early records also show John de Stampes who recorded in the Pipe Rolls of the City of London (1191) and Sir Thomas Stampe who appeared in the Feet of Pines Rolls for Essex in 1424.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John de Stampes, dated 1191, in the London City Pipe Rolls. It was during the reign of King Richard 1, who was known as “The Lionheart,” dated 1189-1199.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were like James Stampe who settled in Virginia in 1663. Thomas Stamp settled in Virginia in 1635.  Samuel and Sophie Stamp settled in New York in 1823 with two children. In Newfoundland, Anty Stamp settled in Trepassey in 1830.

Stamps Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(co. Berks). Sable a fess between three horses passant argent. Crest—On a ducal coronet a swan, wings endorsed, ducally gorged all proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Crown
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187