Tinker Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Tinker Family Coat of Arms

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Tinker Coat of Arms Meaning

Tinker Name Origin & History

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Tinker Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Tinker blazon are the chevron, attire and cross crosslet. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.9The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The magnificent antlers of the stag are known in heraldry as attires, which can appear as a charge on their own (usually with part of the scalp attached) 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:attire, or a stag may be attired of a different colour. Like many similar forest creatures, stags and their antlers are probably intended to represent pleasure taken in the hunt. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Tinker Name

This interesting surname is of early English origin, and is professional for a mender of pots and pans.  The name acquired from the Middle English (1200 – 1500) ‘tink(l)er’, of uncertain origin.  Travelling pedlars were also known by this name because they made their approach known by tinking, by either ringing or making a tinkling noise.

More common variations are: Tincker, Tinaker, Tinnker, Tienker, Tinkher, Tineker, Tiencker, Teiniker, Tonker, Tanker. The surname Tinker first appeared in London, where a Laurence Tinekere is a listing from 1244-46 in “The History of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital.”  From early times, recordings of Tinker can found in both southern and northern England.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert le Tinker, dated 1243,  in the “Assize Rolls of Somerset”. It was during the reign of King Henry 111, who was known as “The Frenchman”, dated 1216-1272.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the people with the name Tinker who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Tinker, his wife and their son, who arrived in Plymouth, MA, in 1620.  Thomas Tinker, who arrived in Plymouth, Mass in 1620.  John Tinker, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1635.  John Tinker, who arrived in Boston in 1635.  Ann Tinker, who settled in Virginia in 1657. Some of the people with the surname Tinker who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Melger Tinker, aged 16, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1739. Some of the people with the surname Tinker who came in the Canada in the 18th century included Mary Tinker, who settled in New Brunswick in 1779.

Tinker Family Gift Ideas

Browse Tinker family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Argent a chevron between three attires of a stag affixed to the scalp sable. Crest—A cross crosslet azure.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
9. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:attire
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103