Tolman Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Tolman Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Tolman Coat of Arms Meaning

Tolman Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Tolman. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

tolman coat of arms

Tolman Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Tolman blazon are the martlet, ducal coronet and axe. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, sable and or .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

Crowns are frequently observed in Heraldry 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184, but we should not make the mistake of assuming that these are always on Royal arms 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138. Many of the orders of nobility across Europe were entitled to wear crowns and coronets, Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons in England each had their own distinctive headwear 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350. The ducal coronet is an example of this, being gold with a brim of strawberry leaves and a cap of crimson velvet. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Crown It may also be the case that a crown is added to an existing coat of arms as an augmentation in recognition of some service to a King 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187.

The Axe appears in many forms in heraldic art, coming from both the martial and the craft traditions, indeed someone today would have a hard time telling their common hatchet from a turner’s axe, but it is likely that those in the middle ages were more familiar with each. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Axe Obviously the axe from a craft tradition may symbolise the holder being a practitioner of that craft, but the axes from a martial background are suggested by Wade to indicate the “execution of military duty”. 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100

Tolman Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Tolman Name

Tolman Origin:

England

Origin of Tolman:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the name, this name was listed as Talman, Toleman, Tollman, and Tolman. It is an English surname. It has a professional origin and acquires from the pre 7th Century word “toll” which mean a tax, and the word “mann” a worker or employer; and so, the whole meanings of the name are a collector of taxes. “Toll-men” were made an important part of life from the Normans from the 19th Century and were the most important type of local tax collection. They frequently stopped at all the stations to a town, and sometimes on the overpass, bridges, and the next toll-roads. Professional surnames became inherited when a son supported his father into the trade. This name first listed in the first half of the 13th Century, and primary example consists of William Tolman, in the premium Rolls of Somerset in 1327. Examples of documentations derived from early remaining parish records consist of the wedding in May 1559 of Alice Tolman and John Fuller at St. Mary’s Athill, in the city of London.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Toleman, Toulman, Tollman, Toliman, Tolaman, Tohlman, Toolman, Toloman, Toelman, Tolmane.

England:

The surname Tolman was first organized in Lincolnshire where they held a family seat as Lords of Castle. The Saxon effect of English past reduced later the Campaign of Hastings in 1066. French was the language of courts for later three centuries, and the Norman atmosphere overcame. But Saxon surnames existed and the family name first introduced in the year 1219 when Hereward Tholeman held lands.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Hereward Tholeman, which was dated 1219, in the “Assize Court Rolls of the division of Lincolnshire.” It was during the time of King Henry III of England, 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Tolman settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Tolman who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Tolman, who settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1640.

Some of the people with the name Tolman who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Pierre Tolman, who settled in Pennsylvania in 1754.

Some of the individuals with the name Tolman who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Tolman at the of 34, who came to the United States, in 1892. Annie Tolman at the age of 24, who arrived in America, in 1892. Charles Tolman at the age of 27, who landed in America, in 1895. E.M. Tolman at the age of 40, who arrived in America, in 1896. Charles H. Tolman at the age of 29, who came to the United States from London, in 1897.

Some of the people with the name Tolman who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Eduard Tolman, who emigrated to the United States, in 1905. Catherine Tolman, at the age of 22, who landed in America from Burton on Trent, in 1906. Dr. Tolman at the age of 42, who emigrated to America, in 1911. Daniel H. Tolman at the age of 63, who landed in America, in 1915. Alice M. Tolman, at the 39, who landed in America, in 1921.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Tolman: United States 4,952; England 446; Netherlands 328; Mexico 209; Canada 201; South Africa 201; Australia 136; France 122; Russia 81; Czech Republic 44.

Notable People:

Aiden Tolman (born 1988), is an Australian football League player.

Andrew Tolman (born 1986), is an American musician, co-creator of another rock groups Imagine Dragons and The Moth & The Flame.

Brett Tolman was a United States Authority joined in loyalist Act Reauthorization and disputed over the incarceration of U.S. attorneys.

Chadwick A. Tolman was a 1970s duPont research chemist and after that the Tolman cone angle and Tolman electronic framework named.

Edward C. Tolman (1886–1959), was an American psychiatrist.

James E. Tolman (1867–1956), was a Massachusetts advocate and state member.

Richard C. Tolman (1881–1948), was an American mathematical analyst and real chemist.

Teun Tolman (1924–2007), was a Dutch leader.

Tim Tolman (born 1956), is an old Major League Baseball referee.

Warren Tolman (born 1959), is an old Massachusetts congressman.

Tolman Family Gift Ideas

Browse Tolman family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More tolman Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Sable a martlet argent between three ducal coronets or. Crest—Two arms in armour embowed wielding a battle axe all proper.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Crown
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Axe
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100