Westlake Coat of Arms

Click below to change main image

westlake coat of arms, westlake family crest
Buy Coat of Arms Image Buy Meanings Report Buy Coat of Arms T-shirt
 
Buy Coat of Arms Gifts Buy Genealogy Report

Which coat of arms or "family crest" is mine?

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kilkhampton, co. Cornwall). Az. three bars wavy ar.
2) (Plymouth, co. Devon). Sa. a fess or, betw. five owls, three in chief and two in base ar.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Westlake Coat of Arms and Family Crest

We don’t yet have this section of research completed for this name. If you are interested in being notified when research becomes available, please use this form to contact us and we will let you know as soon as we have something!

Westlake Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Westlake blazon are the bars wavy and owl. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and owl .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). It is also possible to place decorative edges along bars, typically these are smaller than those found on the major ordinaries like the fess and pale, but have the same design and share the same meanings. The decorative edge pattern Wavy, is a typical example of this. For obvious reasons it is associated with both water and the sea 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The owl has long been associated with heraldry and is depicted in a clearly recognised aspect, always with its face to the viewer. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Owl It comes as no surprise that previous generations of heraldic writers ascribed to it the traits of “vigilance and acute wit”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77

Leave A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Owl
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77