Whetstone Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Whetstone Family Coat of Arms

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Whetstone Coat of Arms Meaning

Whetstone Name Origin & History

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Whetstone Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Whetstone blazon are the lion, cinquefoil, broken spear and arm in armour. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, gules and argent .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The spear or lance is a typical example, often borne (for obvious reasons) in allusion to the crucifixtion. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111 Sometimes only the head is shown, and on other occasions the tilting or tournament spear is specified, familiar to us from many a jousting scene in the movies. 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Whetstone Name

Whetstone Origin:

England

Origins of Whetstone:

The surname of Whetstone is said to be a locational surname that is found within the country of England, which is also believed to be the country where it was derived. Since the surname of Whetstone is locationation, this means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. The locations from which the surname of Whetstone is said to be derived can be found throughout the country of England. The most prominent place from which the surname of Whetstone is said to have been derived from is the area of Whetstone, which was a parish within the area of Leicestershire, and was said to have been located just five miles outside of the capital. The people who originally bore the surname of Whetstone are said to hail from the parish of Whetstone.

Variations:

More common variations are: Wheatstone, Whettstone, Whetestone, Whetsstone, Whietstone, Wheetstone, Whetston, Whitestone, Whitstone, Whetstune

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Whetstone is said to be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Edward Whytestone was mentioned and recorded in the document known as the Register of the University of Oxford, which is located within the area of Bedfordshire, in the year of 1615. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King James I of England, who was known throughout the ages, and commonly known to as one “King of Great Britian and Ireland,” but it is unclear if people referred to him as such because he appointed himself to this title. King James I ruled from the year of 1603 to the year of 1625. Other mentions of the surname of Whetstone within the country of England include one John Whetstone and Jane Price, who were married in the year of 1719 at St. Antholin, which is located within the city of London, and one Nicholas Wetstone, who was married to a woman named Mary Bowman at St. George’s Chapel, which is located in Mayfair, in the year of 1750.

United States of America:

Througout the 17th and 18th centuries many European citizens migrated to the United States of America, which at that time was known as the New World or the Colonies, in search of a better, more promising life for them and their families. This movement of people was known as the European Migration. One Stephen Whetstone, who arrived in Maryland in 1666 was the first person who was recorded to bear this surname in America.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Whetstone: United States 6,420; England 398; Canada 314; Australia 74; Israel 47; Scotland 20; Azerbaijan 3; Czech Republic 2; United Arab Emirates 2;

India 1; Georgia 1; Burkina Faso 1

Notable People:

Henry Whetstone and Ester Whetstone, who were chocolate makers from America who founded the company named Whetstone Chocolates in the area of St. Augustine, Florida, in the year of 1967.

Diane McKinney Whetstone (born in 1953) who was an African-American author.

Peter Whetstone (died in 1843) who was a leader of the early pioneers in the Republic of Texas, and who was the co-founder of the city of Marshall, Texas.

William Edwin “Ed” Whetstone (1908-1987) who was a civic leader and a businessman from America.

Martha Whetstone, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of California in the year of 1996.

Frank Whetstone, who served as a Delegate to the Republican National Convention from the state of Montana in the year of 1948, and who was an Alternate Delegate to the Republican National Convention from the state of Montana in the year of 1952, and who was a Republican politician from America.

David Whetstone, who served as a Delegate to the Republican National Convention from the state of Alabama in the year of 2012, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Whetstone Family Gift Ideas

Browse Whetstone family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Woodford Row, co. EsseX). Argent a lion rampant sable on a canton gules a cinquefoil ermine. Crest—An arm embowed in armour sable garnished or, grasping a broken tilting-spear gold, head argent streamers gules.

1 Comment

  • This is very informative website. My Great Grandfather arrived on Ellis Island in1903 coming from what was Russia at the time. His name was then changed to Wetstone by the authorities.I have always felt a relation to Scotland for some strange reason?

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear