Woods Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Woods Family Coat of Arms

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Woods Coat of Arms Meaning

Woods Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Woods. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Woods Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Woods blazon are the savage, lion, martlet and trefoil. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Heraldry is a human art, by and for people and it is not surprising that people themselves are frequently depicted in arms 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. As well as the nobility themselves, we also see both the mundane, ploughmen, fishermen and reapers; and the exotic in the form of club wielding savagesand the Moorish or Saracen gentleman with his decorative wreathed turban 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 14A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Woods Name

Woods Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Woods hails from the country of England. This surname of Woods is believed to be a patronymic surname, with the suffix “s” denoting the meaning of “son of.” This surname is believed to be a topographical surname, which means that the original bearers of the surname lived on or near a distinguishable landmark within their city or town. In the case of topographical surnames, they can be used to describe someone who lived in a wood. It is also possible that the surname of Woods also hails from an occupation, meaning to describe the son of a wood cutter, or a forester. An occupational surname was given to the original bearer, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. In the case of the surname of Woods, it is believed to have hailed from the Old English, Pre 7th Century word of “wudu” which can be translated to mean “wood.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Wood, Woode, Atwood, Bywood, Attwood, Wode, Woodes, Woodus, Woodis, Wooods, Woodas, Woodys, Woodss, Woodsa, Woodso, Woodse, Wodeson, Woodison, Woodson, Woodeson,

History:

England:

The surname of Woods was first recorded as being spells Wode, and was recorded in the country of England. One person who was named as Walter de la Wode was mentioned and named in the Book of Fees for the county of Herefordshire in the year of 1242. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of King Henry III of England, who was commonly known as and referred to throughout the ages as one “Henry of Winchester.” King Henry III ruled from the year 1216 to the year 1272. Other mentions of the surname of Woods in the country of England included one John de Wode, who was recorded as living in the county of Yorkshire in the year of 1274, one John Atewode who was recorded as living in the county of Essex in the year of 1274, one Elias in le Wode who hailed from Cambridgeshire in the year of 1279, and one William Bythewode who came from Sussex in the year of 1296. Because this surname of Wood is so common within the country of England, there are many early recordings of this surname, especially within the church records of this country. Those who bear the surname of Woods in the country of England can be found in large concentrations in the areas of Lancashire, Norfolk, Suffolk, and the areas in and around the city of London.

Scotland:

The country of Scotland has a high population of people who bear the surname of Woods. Many people who bear this surname of Woods can be found within the southwestern region of Scotland, and in the counties of Lanarkshire and Dumfries-shire.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Woods: United States 189, 865; England 31,018; Australia 16,886; Canada 12,597; Liberia 6,197; South Africa 5,242; Nigeria 4,738; Ireland 3,925; Scotland 3,144; New Zealand 2,883

Notable People:

Philip Wells Woods (1931-2015) who was a jazz bebop and alto saxophonist from America, who aslo was a clarinetist, bandleader and composer, and who is most notably recognized for his rendition of the Billy Joel song “Just the Way You Are”

Sylvia Woods (1926-2012) who was a restaurateur from America who is known for co-founding the landmark restaurant Sylvia’s in Harlem which is located on Lenox Avenue, New York City

Don Woods (1927-2012) who was a meteorologist and cartoonist from America

Eldrick Tont “Tiger” Woods (born in 1975) who is a professional golfer from America, who, as of now, with all of his lifetime achievements into consideration is considered as one of the most successful golfers of all time

James Woods (born in 1947) who is an actor from America

Christopher “Chris” Charles Eric Woods (born in 1959) who was a former football player from England

Margaret Louisa Woods (1856-1945) who was a writer from England

Sir Albert William Woods GVCO, KCB, KCMG, KGstJ, FSA (1816-1904) who was an officer of arms from England

Charles Arthur Woods (1929-2015) who was a rugby union player from New Zealand, was a player for Southland from the year 1951 to the year 1956, and who played for the New Zealand National Team from the year 1953 to the year 1954

Woods Family Gift Ideas

Browse Woods family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

"1) (London, 1812). Motto—Robur. Az. a woodman ppr. wreathed about the temples and waist with laurel vert, holding in his dexter hand a club head downwards in pale or, his sinister arm extended and pointing upwards, and his dexter foot resting on a bezant, on a chief of the last a lion pass. guard. gu. Crests—Dexter: Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi woodman ppr. supporting over his shoulder a club of the first; sinister: Issuing out of a ducal coronet or, a mount vert, thereon a lion statant guard. of the first in front of an
oak tree ppr. fructed or."
2) (Norwich, co Norfolk; granted by Bysshe, Clarenceux, 2 July, 1664). Ar. on a chev. betw. three martlets sa. five gouttes of the first. Crest—A martlet sa. wings endorsed guttée d’ar.
3) (co. Sussex). Ar. on a fess ragulée az. three fleurs-de-lis or, in cnief a trefoil slipped vert. Crest—A gauntlet ppr. betw. two ostrich feathers erect ar.
4) (Llanwyfhan and Rhosinor, Wales). Gu. a chev. or, betw. three owls ar.
5) (Sir William Woods, Garter King of Arms). Az. a wild man ppr. wreathed about the loins, holding a club all ppr. the right foot resting on a globe or, on a chief of the last a lion pass. guard. gu.
6) (Wigan, co. Lancaster). Motto—Labor et perseverentiâ. Ar. a chev. nebulée gu. guttée d’eau betw. three martlets sa. Crest—A staff ragulee fesswise sa. thereon a martlet, wings elevated also sa. guttée d’eau.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
14. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79