Wynn Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Wynn Family Coat of Arms

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Wynn Coat of Arms Meaning

Wynn Name Origin & History

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Wynn Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Wynn blazon are the eagle, fleur-de-lis, lion and boar. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and vert .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 18Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 19A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 20The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Wynn Name

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Baron Newborough). Motto—Suaviterin modo, fortiter in re. Az. three fleurs-de-lis or. Crest—A dexter arm in armour holding in the hand ppr. a fleur-de-lis or. Supporters—Two lions ramp. gu. the dexter gorged with a collar or, charged with three fleurs-de lis sa., the sinister with a collar ar. charged with three crosses pattée gu.
2) (Gwydyr, co. Carnarvon, bart., extinct 1719; descended through Joun Wynn ap Meredith, of Gwydyr, and Roderick, Lord of Anglesey, from Owen Gwynedd, Prince of North Wales. Mary, dau. and heir of Sir Richard Wynn, fourth bart., m. Bertie, thirteenth Baron Willoughby de Eresby, fourth Earl of Lindsay, created Marquess of Lindsay and Duke of Ancaster. On the death, without issue male, of Sir Richard Wynn, he was s. in the baronetcy by his cousin, Sir John Wynn, who d. s. p., when the baronetcy expired. His great estates he devised to his kinsman, Sir Watkin Williams, Bart., M.P., son and heir of Sir John Williams, Bart., by Jane, his wife, dau. and heir of Edward Thelwall, Esq., of Plas-y-Ward, by Sydney, his wife, dau. and heir of William Wynn, Esq., who was son of Sir John Wynn, of Gwydyr; from Sir Watkin Williams derives Williams-Wynn, Bart., of Wynnstay). (Llwyn; of whom Owen Wynn, Esq., of Llwyn, was living in 1799; descended through Morris Wynn, Esq., of Gwydyr, and Roderick, Lord of Anglesey, from Owen Gwynedd, Prince of North Wales). (Berthdu, co. Carnarvon; descended from Griffith Wynn, of Berthdu, second aon of John Wynn, of Meredith, who was a descendant of Wynn, of Gwydyr. The direct male line of the family terminated with Robert Wynn, Esq., of Berthdu and Bodysgallen, M.P. for the Carnarvon boroughs, at whose deceaso the estates devolved on Margaret, dau. and heir of his brother, the Rev. Hugh Wynn, D.D., and wife of Sir Roger Mostin, Bart., of Mostyn, co. Flint). Arms, those of Owen Gwynedd, viz., Vert three eagles displ. in fess or. Crest—An eagle displ. or.
3) (Williams-Wynn, Wynnstay, co. Denbigh, bart.). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, those of Owen Gwynedd, Prince of North Wales, Vert three eagles displ. in fess or, for Wynn; 2nd and 3rd, those of Cadrod Hardd, Ar. two foxes countersalient in saltire, the dexter surmounted of the sinister gu. for Williams. Crest—An eagle displ. or.
4) (Plas Newadd-yn-Bodlith; descended, through Morris ap Llewelyn, of Moeliwrch, from Einion Efell, Lord of Cynllaeth. Gwenhwyfar, dau. and heir of Richard Wynn, Esq., of Plas Newadd, m. Foulk Middleton, of Llansilin, eighth son of Richard Middleton, Governor of Chirk Castle, temp. Edward VI., Mary I., and Queen Elizabeth). (Plas-y-Moeliwrch; descended from Morris ap Llewelyn, ancestor of Wynn, of Plas-Newadd-yn-Bodlith). Arms, those of Einion Efell, viz., Per fess sa. and ar. a lion ramp. counterchanged, armed and langued gu.
5) (Tower, co. Flint; descended through John, third son of Griffith ap Llewelyn, from Einion Efell. The male line terminated with Roger Wynn, Esq., of Tower, who d. s. p., and devised Tower to his widow, from whom it passed to her nicce, wife of the Rev. Hope Wynne Eyton, of Leeswood, co. Flint, who possessed it in 1779). (Hartsheath, co. Flint; descended from Iorwerth, fourth son of Cynric Efell). Arms, those of Cynric Efell, viz., Gu. on a bend ar. a lion pass. sa.
6) (Pentre Morgan; descended from Howell, second son of Owen ap Bleddyn, Lord of Dinmael, third son of Owen Brooyntyn, Lord of Edeirnion, Dinmael, and Abertanat; of this family was Morgan Wynn, of Pentre Morgan, Barrister-at-law, living 1672). Arms, those of Hughes, of Gwerclas, viz., Ar. a lion ramp. sa. armed and langued gu.
7) (Bettws, in Abergellew, co. Carnarvon; descended through Bleddyn, second son of Edryd ap Iorwerth, from Marchudd, Founder of the VIII. Noble Tribe of North Wales and Powys). (Llanolian, co. Carnarvon: descended through Bleddyn, second son of Edryd ap Iorwerth, from Marchudd, Founder of the VIII. Noble Tribe of North Wales and Powys). Arms, those of Marchudd, viz., Gu. a Saracen’s head erased at the neck ppr. wreathed about the temples sa. and ar.
8) (Melai, co. Denbigh, and Maenan, co. Carnarvon descended, through William, second aon of Meredith ap David, of Melai and Vronheulog, and Grono Llwyd-y- Penwyn, from Marchudd, Founder of the VIII. Noble Tribe of North Wales and Powys. Jane, dau. and heiress of John Wynn, Esq., of Melai and Maenan, m. Sir John Wynn, of Bodvaen, ancestor of Lord Newborough). Arms, those of Grono Llwyd, viz., Gu. three boars’ heads in pale erased ar.
9) (Nerquis, co. Flint; descended from Edwyn, Lord of Tegaingle; the heiress m. Thomas Pindar, Esq., son of Sir Paul Pindar). (Pen-y-Clawdd, co. Denbigh; descended from Owen ap Edwyn, Lord of Tegaingle, co. Flint, Founder of the XII. Noble Tribe of North Wales and Powys. Catherine, dau. and heiress of Rev. John Wynn, of Pen-y-Clawdd, m. Daniel Hughes, third and eventually only surviving son of Thomas Hughes, Esq., of Gwerclas and Hendriforfydd, co. Merioneth). Arms, those of Edwyn, Lord of Tegaingle, viz., Ar. a cross flory engr. sa. betw. four Cornish choughs ppr. beaked and legged gu.
10) (Bodrean and Blodwell, co. Carnarvon). Sa. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar.
11) (Dudleston, co. Salop). Ar. a lion ramp sa. Crest—A boar’s head gu. couped or.
12) Gu. on a bend ar. three martlets sa. Crest—A unicorn’s head erased ar. maned, horned, and crined ppr.
13) (Garth, co. Montgomery; descended from Reinallt, third son of Sir Griffith Vychan, Lord of Byngedroyn, Treflydan, Garth, and Caer Fawr. Dorothy Wynn, only dau. and heiress of Brochivell Wynn, Esq., of Garth, m. Richard Herbert Mytton, Esq., of Pontyscouryd, and conveyed to him the lands of Wynn of Garth). Sa. three nags' heads erased ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
19. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
20. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60