Abbott Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Abbott Family Coat of Arms

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Abbott Coat of Arms Meaning

Abbott Name Origin & History

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Abbott Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Abbott blazon are the cross, eagle and griffin. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable and or .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. In its basic form, the cross is created from two broad bands of colour at right angles covering the whole extent of the shield. It has been subject to all manner of embellishment, and the interested reader is referred to the references, especially Parker’s Heraldic dictionary for many examples of these. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P106 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P160-173 Suffice it to say that any armiger would be proud to have such an important device as part of their arms.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]18Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Abbott Name

Abbott Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Abbott comes from the Anglo-Saxons and the Normans, and derives from an occupational name for a person employed by an abbot. This surname could also be a nickname for someone who was thought to conduct themselves like an abbot, and it is possible that this surname may refer to the offspring of an abbot, but because the clergy is supposed to be celibate, this is a widely debated fact. In Scotland, this surname can be both an English translation, or perhaps a translation of McNab, which also can be translated to mean “son of the abbot.” Originally, this surname was spelled “abbod.” In Italian, this surname is spelled as a variation of Abbott, and is translated to be “Abate.” In Germany it is pronounced as “Abt.” In Spanish, the surname of Abbott is Abad,

Variations:

More common variations are:

Abbotts, Abbot, Abbett, Abbitt, Abbet, Abbotson, Abbotte, Abbotto, Aabbott, Abboott, Abboett, Abbottu, Abbottu, Abboitt, Abboutt, Abbottw

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Abbott was in the year 1190. Walter Abbot was recorded in the Danelaw Records of Lincolnshire, under the reign of King Richard I, who was also referred to as “Richard the Lionheart” and ruled from the year 1189 to the year 1199. In the year 1272, Richard Abbod was recorded in Somerset, while George Abbot, who lived from the year 1562 to the year 1633, was appointed as the Archbishop of Canterbury in the year 1611, and Elizabeth Abbot was recorded as living “over the river” in the United States, specifically in the state of Virginia, at that time which was spelled Virginea, in the year 1623, which classified her as one of the first colonists to emigrate to the United States of America. In England, the surname is mostly in Yorkshire and Lancashire, and is also found in smaller concentrations in the southeast coastal colonies.

United States of America:

During the European Migration, which is when English settlers were fed up with their homeland and its poor living conditions, and emigrated out of their home country, many settlers sought out the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as the Colonies, or the New World. The first of these settlers who was recorded to bear the surname of Abbott was George Abbott, who emigrated with his three sons and settled in the town of Rowley, Massachusetts in the year 1630. In that same year, Daniel Abbott landed in the city of Providence, Rhode Island. Arthur Abbott, Christopher Abbott, and George Abbott were soon to follow, settling in the states of Massachusetts, and Virginia between the year 1634 and the year 1637. The surname of Abbott is spread all over the United States of America. However, this surname can be found in high concentrations in the states of New York, Massachusetts, Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, California, Pennsylvania, Washington, and the state of New Jersey.

Scotland:

In the country of Scotland, the surname of Abbott is found in the counties of Angus and Lanarkshire. In 1654 William Abbat was born in Dundee. A couple of generations later, the surname was changed to Abbott.

Ireland

The Abbott surname in Ireland is found mainly in Dublin. John Abbot was granted land in Cork in the 1650s and was also known as “God Be With Us” Abbott.

Australia:

In the 19th Century, it became common for settlers to once again seek out new land and a better life. Australia was one of these areas. James Abbott, who was an English convict from Kent, settled in New South Wales in 1820.

Abbott Today:

United States 62,479

England 18,294

Australia 7,570

Canada 7,441

South Africa 4,584

New Zealand 1,297

Scotland 978

Dominican Republic 937

Wales 926

Brazil 874

 

Notable People:

Margaret Ives Abbott (1878-1955) who was an Olympic gold medalist who placed in golfing in the 1900 Olympic games

Mr. Eugene Joesph Abbott (died in 1912) who was a 14-year-old Third Class Passenger from Rhode Island who died in the sinking of the RMS Titanic

Mr. Rossmore Edward Abott died in 1912) who was a 16-year-old Third Class Passenger from Rhode Island who died in the sinking of the RMS Titanic

Mrs. Rhonda Mary Abbott (ne’e Hunt) who was a thirty-nine-year-old Third Class Passenger from Rhode Island who survived the sinking of the RMS Titanic by boarding collapsible A

Shirley “S.L.” Abbott (1924-2013) who was a businessman, rancher, politician and US Ambassador to Lesotho

Othman Ali Abbott (1824-1935) who was a politician, a Member of the Nebraska State Senate in 1872, and a Delegate to the Nebraska State Constitutional Convention in 1875, and the Lieutenant Governor of Nebraska from 1877 to 1879

Othman Ali Abbott Jr. (1874-1954) who was a politician, and the Mayor of Grand Island, Nebraska in 1932, and again from 1939 to 1940

Abbott Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Ar. a cross sa. fimbriated or, betw. four eagles displ. of the second. Crest—A griffin sejant az. bezantee.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P106
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P160-173
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
18. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150