Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (of that Ilk, co. Banff). Motto—Tace. Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three boars’ heads erased az. Crest—An oak tree acomed on a mount ppr.
2) (Tullibody co. Clackmannan). Ar. a chev. indent. gu. betw. three boars’ heads erased az. armed and langued or, in the middle chief point a crescent vert.
3) (Fetternier, a scion of Birkenbog, created in 1685, Lord Glassfoord). Motto—In cruce salus. Ar. a chev. engr. gu. betw. three boars’ heads erased az. Crest—A cross crosslet fitchee or.
4) (Glasshaugh). Motto—Vive ut vivas. Ar. a chev. indented gu. betw. three boars’ heads erased az. Crest—A bee volant ppr.
5) (South Carolina, 1778). Motto—In cruce salus. Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three boars’ heads erased az. langued of the field an antique crown or. Crest—A cross Calvary gu.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Abercromby Coat of Arms and Family Crest

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Abercromby Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Abercromby blazon are the boar, chevron and greyhound. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and argent .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 8 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 9 We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 10

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 11, or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.12. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 13, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 14 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 15, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 16

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References

  • 1 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 4 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
  • 5 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 8 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
  • 11 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 12 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 13 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
  • 14 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
  • 15 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
  • 16 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69