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Abraham Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Abraham Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Abraham Family Coat of Arms

Variations of this name are: Abram.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Abraham. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Abraham Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Abraham blazon are the estoile, chevron and sun. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and sable .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The sun was long used as a potent symbol before the advent of heraldry and brought some of that existing meaning with it. In conventional heraldry it is normally borne in its splendour, that is with a face and a large number of alternating straight and wavy rays. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sun It can also be seen issuing from behind clouds, and in some cases a demi or half sun coming from the base, reflecting either the dawn, or perhaps as it appears in the arms of WESTWORTH, with the sunset. 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P296

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Abraham Name

Abraham Origin:

Hebrew

Origins of Name:

The Abraham surname derives from the biblical personal name Avraham, the founding father of the Jews and the believed to be the founder of all Semitic people by Muslims. The name is derived from the Hebrew words “av hamon goyim” meaning father of multitude of nations. Throught the middle ages it was a popular personal name used by Jews and Christians. After the Crusades, armies returning to Europe would gift the name to their sons as recognizing their visit to the Holy Land. The personal names would eventually turn into a descriptive surname for descendants, i.e. “the son of Abraham”. The surname is ubiquitous thoughtout all of Europe.

Variations:

More common variations are: Abrahams, Abram, Abrahamson, Abrams, Abram, Abrahamer, Abramsky, Brahms, Abrahamsson, Avraham, Abramovitz, D’Abramo,

History:

England:

The first known instance of the name is in 1086 of a priest referred to as Abraham in the Domesday Book for London.

Abraham de Stradtuna was recorded in Lincolnshire in the Danelaw Rolls in 1170.

The first known recorded instance of the surname is John Abraham in 1197 in Northamptonshire in the Pipe Rolls. Another John Abraham was recorded in 1273 in Bedford. Magota Abraham was recorded in 1379 in Yorkshire in the Poll Tax Rolls.

In Abram, Lancashire lived another Abraham line. The original name was Adburgham then later Abraham. Gilbert de Abram and John Abraham lived in the township in the 14th and 15th century respectively.

The surname Abraham is the 1023rd most common name in Great Britain. The highest concentrations are in County Armagh, Brighton and Hove, Northumberland, and Lancashire.

Ireland:

The Gaelic form of Abraham is Mac an Bhreitheamhan meaning “son of the judge”. The surname is common in many parts of Ireland, especially in Connact and West Ulster.

Scotland:

The first known instance of the surname Abraham was in Balfeth. Adam Abraham was a Bishop of Dunblain and owned land there.

Ethiopia

Ethiopian names are largely Biblical and Islamic in origin. Ethiopians do not have surnames. Rather, they use the fathers first name as their last name. Hence, someone named Abraham Alemayahu Zerihun, would consist of the boy’s name (Abraham), his father’s name (Alemayahu) and his grandfather’s name (Zerihun).

United States:

Many settlers would migrate to the New World, also referred to as the Colonies due to harsh conditions in Europe. Known as the great European Migration many family lines with the surname of Abraham would arrive. The first settler believed to arrive in the United States is John Abraham in 1636 who landed in Virginia. One year later, Geo Abraham would arrive in Virginia as well. 2 years later George Abraham settled in Virginia. During the 18th century two Abrahams would come to settle in the Americas. Sarah Abraham arrived in 1730 in Pennsylvania. And an unknown Abraham arrived in 1783 in America. His or her first name was not known, and it is not known wherein they settled. In the 19th century a larger influx of Abrahams would arrive in the United States. A total of five would arrive and settle in various parts of the country.

India:

The surname Abraham in India normally denotes that the person are descendants of Christians from Kerala. Similar to Ethiopia naming conventions are used by passing down the father’s first name causing a continuous recycling of names. Modern naming conventions in India are changing to keep one surname for the entire family.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Abraham:

95,000 in Ethiopia, 82,000 in Nigeria, 53,000 in India, 34,000 in Eritrea, 33,000 in the United States

Notable People:

Abraham Abraham (1843-1911) American entrepreneur. Jewish American businessman who founded Abraham & Straus in 1865. The department store is currently a part of Macy’s.

Abu Abraham (1924-2002) Indian cartoonist, journalist and author. His career was over 40 years long and he worked in various international newspapers.

Karl Abraham (1877-1925), German psychoanalyst. He collaborated with the famous psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud. Freud called him his “best pupil”.

John Abraham (1672), British governor of what is now the abandonded Hudson’s Bay Company on Hudson Bay in the province of Manitoba, Canada.

Max Abraham (1875), German physicist. Born into a family of Jewish merchants, he became a famous physicist graduating from the University of Berlin.

Nahim Abraham (1885), American businessman. Born in Lebanon, he lead the development of a city named Canadian, Texas.

William Abraham (1842), Welsh politician. Also known as Mabon. He was a Welsh unionist and member of parliament for almost 40 years.

Fred Abraham (1859 – 1901) Britich cricketer who played for the Guyanese national side.

Abraham Family Gift Ideas

Browse Abraham family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Swarthmoorhall, co. Lane.). Sa. a chev. betw. three estoiles ar. Crest - A raven ppr.
2) Az. a sun or. Crest—A sun or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sun
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P296
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
19. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
20. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
21. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
22. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
23. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
25. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
26. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
27. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
28. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
29. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
30. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
31. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sun
32. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P296