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Origin, Meaning, Family History and Acre Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Acre Origin:

England

Origins of Acre:

The Norman Invasion of England in 1066 added many new components to an already vibrant culture. Among these were thousands of new names. The Acre family resided in the division of Cumberland. This surname was a local name meaning the resident at the acre, or the dweller at the plot of arable land. Endless spelling variations are a prevailing characteristic of Norman surnames. Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English scientific stew. French and Latin, the languages of the court, also influenced spellings. Finally, old authors spelled words according to how they sounded, so one person was often related to by different spellings in different documents. The name has spelled Acre, Acres, Aker, Eaker, Eakers, Aiker, Aikers, Aikerson, Aker, Alters, Acker, Ackers, Ackhurst and much more.

Variations:

More common variations are: Aycre, Acree, Acrey, Acrea, Acrie, Achre, Ackre, Acare, Acore, Eacre.

England:

The surname Acre first appeared in the division of Cumberland, where they descended from one of two noble houses, the Lords D'Acre, called D'Acres of the North, and Lord D'Acre of Herstmonceux called D'Acres of the South. Both of these noble branches originally settled at Dacre in Cumberland.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Acre had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Acre landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Acre who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Casper Acre, who came to Pennsylvania in 1687-1727. Sarah Acre, who came to America in the year 1738. Veronica Acre, who settled in Pennsylvania in the year 1741. Christian Acre, who arrived in Pennsylvania in the year 1741. Peter Acre, who came to Pennsylvania in the year 1741.

The following century saw more Acre surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Acre who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Juan De Acre, who arrived in New Granada in the year 1855.

Canada:

Individuals with the surname Acre who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Mr. Lambert Acre U.E., United Empire Loyalist who settled in Canada near the year 1783. Lambert Acre, who came to Canada in the year 1797.

The following century saw more Acre surnames arrive. People with the surname Acre who settled in Canada in the 19th century included William Acre, who came to Ontario in the year 1871.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Acre: Brazil 1,129; United States 939; Philippines 387; Argentina 119; Canada 48; England 22; Spain 4; Lebanon 1; India 1; French Polynesia 1.

Notable People:

Billy White Acre, also known as Bill White Acre, and Bill Whiteacre, is a Canadian film score writer, singer-songwriter, guitarist, and record raiser. He is the founder and creative director of Big Planet Music, Inc., a Los Angeles-based music house that scores music for television, film, and advertising. He is best known for his versatility as a writer and his use of open tunings and percussive guitar playing.

Mark Robert Acre (born September 1968) is a retired professional baseball pitcher. He played all or part of four seasons for the Oakland Athletics from 1994-1997. He also played one season in Japan for the Yakult Swallows in 1998.

Raynold Edward Acre (1889–1966) was a member of the Early Birds of Aviation, a small group of pilots that flew before World War I.

Abba of Acre (Abba d'min Akko), was an Amora from Acre who flourished at the end of the 3rd century. He was greatly respected by Rabbi Abbahu and recommended as an example of modesty.

Joan of Acre (April 1272 – April 1307) was an English princess, a daughter of King Edward I of England and Queen Eleanor of Castile. The name "Acre" derives from her birthplace in the Holy Land while her parents were on a campaign.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Gu. three escallops ar.
2) (Westmorland). Gu. three fusils in fesse or, and in chief as many escallops ar.
3) Gu. three escallops betw. nine trefoils slipped, three three two and one ar.
4) Gu. a fesse fusily betw. three escallops ar.
5) Gu. three lozenges or, in chief as many escallops ar.
6) (Westmorland). Az. on a cross or, (another ar.) four escallops gu.
7) Gu. three escallops ar.

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Comments

Branden Acre commented on 31-Mar-2019
This was a very informative read and presented extremely specific and particular historical details, with references to fortify their validity. It would be amazing if I could somehow utilize online ancestry databases or other similarly designed platforms to attempt to trace my lineage. I would love to discover that I am, in fact, a vast descendent of these families.

References

  • 1 The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
  • 2 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
  • 3 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 4 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 5 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 6 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
  • 7 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
  • 8 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117