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Adlington Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Adlington Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Adlington Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Adlington. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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adlington coat of arms

Adlington Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Adlington blazon are the cross flory, chevron and antelope. The two main tinctures (colors) are argent and sable.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross flory is typical of these, having each arm end in something very similar to the fleur-de-lys.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.10The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The ibex or antelope was drawn by heraldic artists in rather more fearsome aspect than its real-life appearance, with large horns, mane and a long tail. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope These days we regard the ibex as being a member of the goat family rather than an antelope, but in the middle ages there were was no real distinction between these animals. They could adopt many of the poses of the lion, such as rampant and statant. 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Adlington Name

Adlington Origin:

England

Origins of Adlington:

It is an English locational surname. It acquires from either of two hamlets called Adlington, the first in the division of Cheshire near the town of Macclesfield, the second from Lancashire and near to the town of Chorley. In both examples, the translation is considered to be the same, which means ‘ the hamlet of the Eadwulf people,’ with the first place name record being that of Eadulfingtun in the documents known as the Diplomatarium Anglicum for the year 1000 AD. It perhaps relates to the Cheshire hamlet, as this also shows in the famous Domesday Book of 1086 as Edulvintune, while the Lancashire place was first listed in the year 1202, as Adelventon. Locational surnames usually are given either to the local lord of the estate and his descendants, as in the example of the Adlingtons of Adlington in Lancashire, whose arms of three gazelles heads given in 1567, or to old villagers who had moved somewhere else. The easiest way to recognize such people was to call them by the name of the place from whence they came. Spelling being at best average and local languages very thick, usually lead to the advancement of “sounds like” spellings. In this example, the name may be noted as Adlington, and possibly the short forms Adelin, Adelyn, Adlin, and Adling, with Henry Adelyn showing in the Hundred Rolls of the city of Norwich in the year 1273. Royal symbols have given for families in the divisions of Cheshire, a black cross flory on a silver shield, Lancashire, and Norfolk, the latter having the blazon of a black shield carried with three silver goats heads r.emoved

Variations:

More common variations are: Addlington, Adolington, Edlington, Adlingotn, Adlingtin, Edlington, Whatlington, Eddlngton, Whitlington, Whetlington.

England:

The surname Adlington first appeared in Lancashire at Adlington, a small town and local church that dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 where it first noted as Eduluintune. Adlington was part of the Penwortham barony given to Randle de Marsey and after that held by the Ferrers. The place name means “estate related to a man called Eadwulf,” from the Old English specific name with “ing” and “tun.”

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Adlington had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Adlington landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Adlington who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included George Adlington, who came to Baltimore in 1758

The following century saw much more Adlington surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Adlington who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included William Adlington, who came to Philadelphia in 1865.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Adlington: England 1,113; Australia 258; United States 199; New Zealand 142; Canada 137; South Africa 91; Scotland 20; Spain 7; Wales 3; France 3.

Notable People:

Sarah Adlington (born 1986), was a British judoka.

Terry Adlington (1935–1994), was an English football player.

William Adlington was an English translator.

Adlington Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Cheshire). Ar. a cross flory sa.
2) (Adlington, co. Lancaster, 1567, 1613, 1661). Sa. a chev. betw. three antelopes’ heads ar. attired or.
3) (Holme Hale Hall, Norfolk). Motto—Per antiquam eartam. Sa. a chev. betw. three goats’ heads erased ar. Crest—A goat's head as in the arms.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
10. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
19. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
20. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
21. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
22. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
23. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
25. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope
26. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210