Aitcheson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Aitcheson Family Coat of Arms

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Aitcheson Coat of Arms Meaning

Aitcheson Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Aitchison.

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Aitcheson Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Aitcheson blazon are the spur rowel and double eagle. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and sable .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The word spur as a noun indicates a spike on the back of horseman’s boot to goad a horse into action, and for the same reason as a verb it signifies “encouraging action”. Because of this, Guillim assigns the meaning “press onward” to the prescence of a spur in a coat of arms. 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P256 It can be depicted either as the full item, with connections to the boot, or just as the star-shaped spur rowel which contains the spikes. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spur

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!The Double-headed eagle is a variant often seen in Germanic heraldry.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Aitcheson Name

Aitcheson Origin:

Scotland

Origins of Aitcheson:

This famous surname was noted as being of Anglo-Scottish origins, although with Norman predecessors. Found with the spellings of Atkinson, Aitchison, Acheson, Aicheson, and Aitcheson, it is a patronymic form of the old male given name Atkin or Adkin, itself a double shortened form of the Hebrew name ‘Adam,’ which means ‘red earth.’ Adam (as a baptismal name) was first noted in the English Domesday Book of 1086, suggested that it was an introduction after the 1066 Conquest. Certainly, after that, it became slightly more famous creating more diminutives like Adcock and Atcock, with similar meaning. Early examples contain as Adekin filius Turst (Adekin the son of Turst) in the 1191 Pipe Rolls of Norfolk, and John Adekyn in the 1296 Records of Crowland Abbey, Cambridgeshire. William Atkyns noted in the Premium Rolls of Worcestershire, dated 1327, and John Atkinson noted in the Taxes relating to the feudal records of the division of Westmorland in 1402. More examples are those of James Aitchesoun, master of the Scottish Mint in 1553, and Marc Aichesone or Acheson of Achesounes hevin (now Morrisons Haven), in 1609.

Variations:

More common variations are: Aitchieson, Atcheson, Aitchson, Itcheson, Aitchison, Autcheson, Atchesson, Aitchesen Atchson, Atchison

Scotland:

The surname Aitcheson first appeared in Berwickshire, an old division of Scotland, presently part of the Scottish Borders Council Area, located in the eastern part of the Borders Region of Scotland, where one of the first recordings of the name was Johannes Filius Ade was a “custurnar” of North Berwick in 1384 and after that shows as John Atkynsoun in 1387.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Atkynsoum, dated about 1387, in the “Records of North Berwick,” Scotland. It was during the time of King Robert II of Scotland, dated 1371 – 1390.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Aitcheson had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Aitcheson landed in the United States in 19th century. Some of the people with the name Aitcheson who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Robert Aitcheson who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1866.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Aitcheson who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Aitcheson arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832. Robert Aitcheson arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship “Agincourt.” Jane Aitcheson and Jane Aitcheson, both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Agincourt” in the year 1850.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Aitcheson who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included James Aitcheson, Sarah Aitcheson, Jane Aitcheson and John Aitcheson, all arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Resolute” in the same year 1865.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Aitcheson: United States 415; Jamaica 250; New Zealand 208; England 183; Canada 162; Australia 156; Fiji 146; South Africa 110; Scotland 66; Northern Ireland 60.

Notable People:

Joseph Leiter Aitcheson Jr. was born in July 1928 in Olney, Maryland. He is an American steeplechase jockey who was drafted into the National Museum of Racing Hall of Fame in 1978.

Aitcheson Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Gosford, co. Edinburgh). Ar. a two-headed eagle displ. sa. on a chief vert two spur rowels or.
2) (Sydserff, Scotland). The same within a bordure invecked of the second. Motto—Ane chast arbor.
3) (Pittenweem Scotland, 1672). Motto—Observe. Or, a double­headed eagle displ. sa. on a chief vert a cross staff between two spur rowels gold. Crest—An astrolob ppr.
4) (Roehsolloch, co. Lanark). Motto—Vigilantibus. Ar. a double-headed eagle displ. sa. on a chief vert a crescent of the field betw. two spur rowels or. Crest—A cock ppr.
5) (Gen. Sir John Aitcheson, K.C.B., 1867). Motto—Vigilantibus. Ar. a double-headed eagle displ. sa. charged on the breast with a garland of laurel or, a bordure embattled of the third, on a chief also of the third a mural crown between two mullets of the fourth. Crest—A cock standing on a trumpet or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P256
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spur
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74