Alcock Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Alcock Family Coat of Arms

Variations of this name are: Alcocke.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Alcock. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Alcock Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Alcock blazon are the scythe, cock, fleur-de-lis and fesse. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Both the sickle and the scythe are implements instantly recognisable to a person of the middle ages, and are depicted in their conventional forms. 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:scythe In addition to their obvious assocation with farming, Wade suggests that they can have a wider meaning of “a fruitful harvest of things hoped for”. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P98

The cock, and other members of its avian family are often found in coats of arms, although telling them apart simply from their images can sometimes be a challenge! Many times the precise choice of species arises as a play on words on the family name, sometimes now lost in history. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cock The cock itself, Wade points out is a “bird of great courage” and might be used as a symbol of “watchfullness”, being the herald of the dawn. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Alcock Name

Alcock Origin:

England

Origins of Alcock:

This is a very popular English name, coming from a shortened form of many male particular names starting with “Al”, specifically Alan, Albert, Alban, and Alexander, with the famous old addition of “cock”, from the Olde English pre 7th Century “cocc”, Middle English (1200 – 1500) “cok”, used here as a pet name for the bird. The origin of the nickname could be for several purposes like when it was most frequently used for a young boy who walked around in a bold and determined way, and as such soon became a universal name for young men. It added to the small forms of various old names, like Allcock, Hancock, and Hiscock. The nickname may also have been used for an early riser or a natural manager. The name can also be spelled as Allcock or Alcock. Documentation from London Parish Records contain the marriage of John Alcock and Agnes White in October 1545, at St. Mary Magdalene’s, Old Fish Street, and the christening of Dorothie, daughter of Thomas Alcock, in June 1550, at St. Mary the Virgin, Aldermanbury.

Variations:

More common variations are: Allcock, Alecock, Aulcock, Alicock, Alcocke, Ailcock, Alcoc, Alcok, Allicock, Allcoak.

England:

The surname Alcock was first discovered in Cheshire where they were a family there for a long time, but many of their old records have disappeared. They later moved to the southeast in Norfolk, Suffolk, and the home provinces.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Alexander Alecoc, dated about 1275, in the “Premium Rolls of Worcestershire.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Alcock had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Alcock landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Alcock who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included George Alcock of the “Mayflower” landings in 1620. Agnes Alcock, who came to Boston in 1635. Franci Alcock, who arrived in South Carolina in 1638. John Alcock, who landed in Maine in 1639. Samil Alcock, who landed in Virginia in 1650.

People with the surname Alcock who landed in the United States in the 18th century included William Alcock, who arrived in Jamaica in 1743.

The following century saw much more Alcock surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Alcock who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included John Alcock who settled in Maine in the same year. Robert Alcock, who arrived in New Hampshire in 1825. Georgia Alcock, who came to Maryland in 1838.

Canada:

The following century saw more Alcock surnames arrive. People with the surname Alcock who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Mansfield Alcock at Shelter Grace in 1801.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Alcock who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Edward Alcock arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Phoebe” in 1846. Edward Alcock, Frederick Alcock, Charles Alcock, and Arthur Alcock, all arrived in South Australia in the same year 1852 aboard the ship “Epaminondas.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Alcock: England 5,265; South Africa 3,415; Australia 1,805; United States 1,581; Canada 1,162; Namibia 977; New Zealand 367; Wales 339; France 245; Scotland 243.

Notable People:

Alfred William Alcock was a British scientist.

C. W. Alcock was a British sports producer and author of the FA Cup.

Charles R. Alcock was an American stargazer.

Deborah Alcock was a British fantasy writer.

Edward Alcock was an English football player who played for the Tranmere Rovers.

George Alcock was a British astronomer.

George Alcock (footballer) was an English football player.

Alcock Family Gift Ideas

Browse Alcock family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Cheshire). Ar. a fesse gu. betw. three scythes sa.
2) (Badly, co. Suffolk). Ar. a chev. betw. three cocks’ heads erased gu. beaked and wattled ar.
3) (Bishop of Ely). Ar. a chev. betw. three cocks’ heads erased sa. within a bordure gu. charged with eight crowns or.
4) (Kent). Ar. on a fesse gu. betw. three scythes sa. as many fleurs-de-lis or. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet az. a demi swan erm. wings expanded, and ducally crowned or.
5) (Silvertoft, co. Northampton. Granted, 8 June, 1616). Gu. a fesse betw. three cocks’ heads erased ar. beaked and crested or. Crest—A cock erm. beaked and membered or.
6) Ar. on a chev. betw. three cocks’ heads erased sa. the two in chief respecting each other, an escallop shell or, in the middle chief point the letters AL az.
7) Per pale or and az. a chev. betw. three eagles displ. all counterchanged, on a chief gu. three lozenges erm.
8) Ar. a fesse betw. three cocks’ heads erased sa. membered gu. Crest—A cock.
9) (William Alcock, Esq. Waterford, temp. Charles II.). Motto—Vigilate. Gu. a fesse betw. three cocks’ heads erased ar. combed and wattled or. Crest— A pomeis charged with a cross pattee or, thereon a cock sa.
10) (Grange, co. Waterford, and Wilton, co. Wexford). Motto—Vigilate. Ar. a fesse betw. three cocks’ heads erased sa. Crest—On a pomeis charged with a cross pattee or, a cock sa.
11) (Kilbritain Castle, co. Cork). Sa. a fesse betw. three cocks’ heads erased ar. combed and wattled or. Crest—A cock ar. combed and wattled gu. spurred az. Motto—Vigilanter.
12) (Ridge, co. Chester, 1449). Ar. a fesse az. betw. three scythes sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:scythe
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P98
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cock
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489