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Alde Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Alde Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Alde Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Alde. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Alde Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Alde blazon are the griffin, ogress and demi lion. The two main tinctures (colors) are ermine and sable.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]9Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and pellet is a roundle sable, or black. It is also known as an ogress or gunstone. Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

The demi-lion is a variant of the typical creature shown only from the waist upward. It can take all same poses and attitudes of its fully represented brethren and often appears to be emerging from some other device such as a fess or chief. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion No special significance should be given to the demi appearance and it should be taken to have the same meanings and interpretations as the noble king of beasts itself.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Alde Name

Origins of Alde:
A family of Strathclyde-Briton were the first to use the name Aide. They resided at Auld in Ayrshire.  In the era before dictionaries, there were no rules governing the spelling or translation of names or any other words.  Consequently, there are a large number of spelling variations in old Scottish names.  Alde has found as Auld, Alda, Alde, Ald, Aulde, MacAuld and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Aldie, Alade, ALdea, Alide, Alode, ALude, ALede, Yalde, Aldee, Aalde.

Scotland:
The surname Alde first appeared in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Air), previously a district in the southwestern Strathclyde region of Scotland, that today makes up the Cabinet Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire, where the surname noted as Ealda in an Old English charter of 765.  The family continued to prosper in this area for centuries, and by 1284, John Alde noted as a servitor of the Lord of Carrick.  By 1302, they had also acquired estates in Perthshire.

United States of America:
The ancestors of all of these Scottish settlers have been able to recover their lost national culture in the last century through highland games and Tribe societies in North America.  Among them as Robert Auld of Kilbride who moved to North America in 1679.

Motto:
The motto was originally a war cry or catchword.  Mottoes first started to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries but were not in general use until the 17th century.  Thus, the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto.  Mottoes sometimes form part of the grant of arms as Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional part of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will like many families have chosen not to display a motto. Motto: Virtute et constantia Motto Translation: By courage and determination.

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Browse Alde family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kent). Erm. on a chief sa. two griffins combatant ar. Crest—A torteau.
2) Ar. on a pale sa. betw. two ogresses, a demi lion ramp. or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
9. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
19. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
20. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
21. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
22. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
23. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
24. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion