Aldworth Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Aldworth Family Coat of Arms

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Aldworth Coat of Arms Meaning

Aldworth Name Origin & History

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Aldworth Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Aldworth blazon are the cross crosslet fitchee, billet, boar and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and azure .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the billet is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. In form it is a simple rectangle though sometimes has a slightly rounded or ragged appearance to reflect one possible origin as a block of wood cut by an axe. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Billet. Wade groups the billet with the other square charges as symbols of “honesty and constancy”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P95

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Aldworth Name

Aldworth Origin:

England

Origins of Aldworth:

The Anglo-Saxon name Aldworth acquires from when the family lived in the church of Aldworth, in the division of Berkshire. The name of that place acquires from Old English words meaning 0ld land or farm. The name itself was derived from a geographical location known as “of Aldworth” which was a parish in Berkshire, near the place known as Wantage.

Variations:

More common variations are: Oldworth, Altworth, oldewoth, Aldrith, Alderath, Aldurthi, Alderthay, Alderthey, Aladurthi, Ealdurthi.

England:

The surname Aldworth first appeared in Berkshire, Where this Saxon family of great oldness held the lands and church of Aldworth despite the Norman Invasion and Conquest of 1066 by Duke William of Normandy.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Aldworth had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Aldworth landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 18th. Some of the people with the name Aldworth who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Edward Aldworth at the age of 13, landed in Bermuda in 1635. Dix Aldworth at the age of 15, arrived in Barbados in 1635. Eliz Aldworth at the age of 15, landed in Bermuda in 1635. Elizabeth Aldworth who landed in Bermuda with her brother Edward in 1635 Where they started their plantations. They later moved to the mainland. Matthew Aldworth, who landed in New Hampshire in 1649.

The following century saw many more Aldworth surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Aldworth who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Joseph Aldworth arrived in Philadelphia in 1848. Richard Aldworth landed in Philadelphia in 1856.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Aldworth: South Africa 402; England 398; United States 302; Brazil 127; Canada 92; New Zealand 73; Australia 35; Scotland 26; Northern Ireland 2; Taiwan 1.

Notable People:

The Honourable Elizabeth Aldworth, born the Hon. Elizabeth St. Leger, was known in her time as “The Lady Freemason”, and was the first noted woman to be admitted into Regular Freemasonry. She was the daughter of Arthur St Leger, 1st Viscount Doneraile, of Doneraile Court, County Cork, Ireland. She married in 1713 to Richard Aldworth, Esq. Nothing else of her life is known between her initiation into Freemasonry as a young girl and her death almost sixty years later.

Richard Aldworth (MP for Bristol), was an English leader who sat in the House of Commons from 1646 to 1653.

Richard Aldworth (MP for Reading) (c. 1614–1680), was an English leader and founder of the Blue Coat Schools in Reading and Basingstoke.

Robert Aldworth (died 1634) was a Bristol-born English trader and contributor. Much of his wealth, although used often for generous purposes, was acquired through the trade and exploitation of slaves. He became Mayor of Bristol in 1609. He was involved in the first sugar processing business in Bristol, England, where sugar was prepared in ‘sugar houses’. Aldworth’s sugar house refined sugar produced by slaves from Spanish and Portuguese plantations in Madeira, Brazil and the Azores. His tomb is in St Peters Parish in the centre of Bristol and had sugar loaves formed on it. He and his relative Thomas Aldworth were members of the Society of Merchant Venturers, a group dating back to the 16th century to support and protect Bristol merchants and trade. It included the occupation in the transatlantic slave trade.

Charles Aldworth (1677 -September 1714) was an English leader, MP for New Windsor from 1712 to 1714. He was the son of the King’s Auditor, William Aldworth of Frogmore House at Windsor in Berkshire, and his wife, Anne. He was the cousin of Richard Aldworth of Stanlake Park, paternal grandfather of Richard Aldworth, 2nd Baron Braybrooke. He was educated at King’s College, Cambridge, matriculating there in 1693. Recommended by the Duke of Northumberland, he returned as MP for New Windsor in 1712. He sat as MP until his 1714 death in a duel by Colonel Chudleigh, a Whig army officer, involved Aldworth of Jacobitism and profited from Aldworth’s physical disability by shooting him dead in the duel which followed.

Aldworth Family Gift Ideas

Browse Aldworth family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bristol and Wiltshire). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three boars’ heads couped within an orle of eight crosses crosslet fitchee az.
2) (Newmarket, co. Cork, originally Stanlake, Berks: Fun. Ent. of Sir Richard Aldworth, of that place, Provost Marshal of Munster, who d. 21 June, 1629.) Motto—Nec temere nec timide. Ar. a fesse engr. betw. six billets gu. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour the hand grasping a straight sword, all ppr.
3) Ar. crusilly fitchee az. a chev. gu. betw. three boars’ heads couped of the second. Crest—A torteau.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Billet
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P95
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67