Allardice Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Allardice Family Coat of Arms

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Allardice Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Allardice blazon are the boar and fesse wavy. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, gules and sable .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. This created an opportunity to add decorative edging to the band, of many forms, and to very pleasing artisitic effect, at least close up – it must be admitted that at distance some of the forms are hard to distinguish! The decorative edge pattern Wavy, sometimes written as undy is, for obvious reasons, associated with both water and the sea 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Allardice Name

Allardice Origin:

Scotland

Origins of Allardice:

The records of the Allardice family reach back into Scottish history to an old tribe known as the Picts. The ancestors of the Allardice family resided in the old barony of Allardice, in the church of Arbuthnott in Kincardineshire. This place name acquired from the Gaelic words all which means “cliff” and deas which means “southern.” When the first dictionaries were invented in the last few hundred years, spelling gradually became regulated. Before that time, authors spelt according to sound. Names were often recorded under different spelling variations every time they written. Allardice has written Allardice, Allardyce, Allardes, Allardise, Allardyse, Allerdash, Allerdes, Allyrdes, Allirdasse, Alerdes, Alerdyce, Alerdice, Alderdice, Alderdyce, Alderdise and much more.

Variations:

More common variations are: Alardice, Allardyce, Allerdice, Allordice, Alardyce, Alerdice, Allardes, Allerdyce, Allerdies, Allards.

Scotland:

The surname Allardice first appeared in Kincardineshire (Gaelic: A’ Mhaoirne), an earlier district on the northeast coast of the Grampian region of Scotland, and part of the Aberdeenshire Cabinet Area since 1996, in a barony of the name Allardice, in the church of Arbuthnot, about 1 mile north-west of Inverbervie, where the Allardice Castle (also spelled Allardyce), the sixteenth-century estate house still stands today.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Allardice had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Allardice landed in the United States in the 18th century. Some of the people with the name Allardice who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included John Allardice, who landed at John Allardice, who landed in Charles Town South Carolina in 1768.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Allardice: South Africa 329; Australia 275; England 274; United States 264; Scotland 243; New Zealand 92; Canada 55; -long Kong 47; United Arab Emirates 31; Zimbabwe 5.

Notable People:

James B. Allardice (March 1919, Canton, Ohio — February 1966) was a famous American television comedy author of the 1950s and 1960s. During World War II, he served in the US Army where he wrote the play At War with the Army. Following the war, Allardice joined Yale University where his play was later on Broadway in 1949 and filmed in the same year with Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis. Allardice is best known for his collaborations with writing partner Tom Adair on some highly successful American 1960s TV sitcoms including The Munsters, F Troop, My Three Sons, Gomer Pyle, USMC and Hogan’s Heroes.

Robert Barclay Allardice of Ury (August 1779, Stonehaven, Kincardineshire –May 1854), generally known as Captain Barclay, was a notable Scottish walker of the early 19th century, known as the celebrated Walker. His most famous feat was the walking of 1000 miles in 1000 hours for 1000 guineas in 1809. He was considered the father of the 19th-century sport of pedestrianism, a forebear to racewalking. He should not be confused with his father, who had thought the name Robert Barclay Allardice, who undertook the first redevelopment of the town of Stonehaven.

Robert Edgar Allardice FRSE (1862-1928) was a Scottish mathematician.

Allardice Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (of that Ilk). Motto—In the defence of the distressed. Ar. a fesse wavy gu. betw. three boars' heads erased sa. Crest—A naked man from the middle holding in the dexter hand a scimetar all ppr.
2) (Duninnald, co. Forfar). Motto—Bene qui pacifice. The same Arms within a bordure of the second. Crest—An ear of wheat and branch of palm in saltire ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water