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Almand Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Almand Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Almand Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Almand. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Almand Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Almand blazon are the martlet and gules. The two main tinctures (colors) are vair and gules.

Special patterns, of a distinctive shape are frequently used in heraldry and are know as furs, representing the cured skins of animals 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. Although they were originally derived from real creatures the actual patterns have become highly stylised into simple geometric shapes, bell-like in the case of vair. 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P46-49. vair is a particularly interesting example that resonates today – the “glass” slippers worn by Cinderella are actually a mis-translation of “vair” (i.e. fur) slippers, the very same vair that appears in heraldry! 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vair

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Almand Name

Origins of Almand:
Following the Norman Invasion of England in 1066, the name Almand first found in Britain.  It was a name for a person or family of German heritage.  More research showed the name acquired from the Anglo-Norman-French word aleman, which means German.  It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has regulated.  For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Almand are characterized by many spelling variations.  Authors and priests in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find many variations that refer to a single person.  As the English language changed and incorporated components of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even educated people regularly changed the spelling of their names.  The variations of the name Almand include Almayne, Alman, Allman, Almand, Hallman, Allmaine, Almon, Almand, Altman, Allman, Ellman, Dalman and much more

Variations:
More common variations are: Allmand, Almanda, Almando, Almandi, Alamand, Alemand, Almandu, Almanund, Almandy, Aulmand.

France:
The surname Almand first appeared in Allemagne, now known as Fleury-sur-Orne, near Caen in Normandy.  There is no clear record of the family arriving in Britain but their journey is no doubt.  Some of the first recordings of the name include listings in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273.  Terric Le Alemaund in Buckinghamshire, Henry de Alemania in Nottinghamshire, Bertram de Almannia in Lincolnshire and Robert Almene in Cambridgeshire.  John le Alemaund noted in London in 1284.  The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 list Willelmus Alman.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Almand landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.  Some of the people with the name Almand who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Stephen Almand came to Philadelphia in 1749.  Jacob Almand, who arrived in Pennsylvania in the year 1765.  Nichs Almand, who came to Pennsylvania in the same year 1765. The following century saw more Almand surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Almand who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included H. Alrnand in Norfolk, Virginia, in the year 1820.

Canada:
People with the surname Almand who settled in Canada in the 18th century included John Almand, who landed in Nova Scotia in the year 1760.

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Browse Almand family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Vair, on a fesse gu. three martlets or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P46-49
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vair
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P46-49
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vair
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
20. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
21. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
22. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154