Almond Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Almond Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Almond. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

almond coat of arms

Almond Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Almond blazon are the almond slip and cinquefoil. The two main tinctures (colors) are vert and argent.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

A slip is a step up from a leaf, being a twig with precisely three leaves upon it6 A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P583, hence an almond slip is a twig brunatre (brown) with three almond leaves vert (green). In truth the Almond leaf does not have the distinctive shape of an oak or maple having a simple, classic, “leaf” shaped outline.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

Almond Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Almond Name

This interesting and unusual surname is of Old French and Anglo-Saxon origin and has two possible origins.  Firstly, it may be from the English name for someone from Germany, acquired from the Anglo-Norman French “aleman”, German, or “alemayne”, Germany, from the Late Latin “Alemannus” and “Alemannia”, from a Germanic tribal name, perhaps meaning simply “all the men”. More common variations are: Allmond, Almondo, Alamond, Alemond, Almonde, Aulmond, Almonda, Alimond, Almondi, Almound.

The surname Almond first appeared in the division of Yorkshire and Northumberland, where they held a family seat from old times. The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thomas Ailmun, dated 1279, in the “Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire”. It was during the reign of King Edward I, who was known as “The Hammer of the Scots” dated 1272-1307.

Some of the people with the name Almond who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Awdry Almond who settled in New England in 1635.  Awdry Almond, aged 32, who landed in America in 1635.  People with the surname Almond who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Almond, who landed in New York in 1795.

The following century saw much more Almond surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Almond who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included William Almond, who settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1827. Some of the people with the surname Almond who arrived in the Canada in the 19th century included Margaret Almond, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1757. Some of the individuals with the surname Almond who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Almond, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Brankenmore” in 1846.  Charles Almond, aged 22, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Samuel Boddington” in 1849.  Charles Almond, aged 22, who arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Samuel Boddington”.  George Almond, aged 31, a farm labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1857 aboard the ship “Carnatic”.

Almond Family Gift Ideas

Browse Almond family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More almond Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Argent an almond slip fructed proper. Crest—Three cinquefoils azure stalked and leaved vert.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P583
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil