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Ansell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Ansell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ansell Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Ansell. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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ansell coat of arms

Ansell Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Ansell blazon are the fusil and crescent. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, gules and or .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The fusil is a shape rather like a lozenge but taller and narrower, hence fusily refers to a field of similar shapes arranged in a regulat pattern. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil It is though that the shape originally derived from that of a spindle of yarn. Wade believes that the symbol is of very great age and quotes an earlier writer, Morgan who ascribes it the meaning of “Negotiation”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ansell Name

Ansell Origin:

England, Germany

Origins of Ansell:

This old and interesting name is of Old Germanic source, from a particular name combination of the components “ans,” which means god, and “helm,” which means head protector, helmet. The name is especially related to the northern, Lombardy, an area of Italy, and was famous all over the country as Anselm. The given name first brought into England by St. Anselm (1033 – 1109), a priest of Canterbury, who was a Lombard by birth. Although it was never famous with the English, the specific name formed many kinds of surnames, ranging from Ansell, Anshell, and Ansill, to Hansel(l), Hansill and Hancell, and the shortened form Anslyn. The surname was first noted at the end of 12th Century, and the recordings contain a Roger Aunsel in the year 1271 in Staffordshire, William Ansel in the year 1279 in Cambridgeshire and William Hansell in the year 1495 in Yorkshire. The wedding of Thomas Ansell and Gwynne Jones noted at St. Giles’ Cripplegate, London, in May 1588.

Variations:

More common variations are: Answell, Anssell, Anselle, Ansello, Ainsell, Ansel, Ansiello, Anasella, Anisello, Ainselly.

England:

The surname Ansell first appeared in the English district of Kent where they gave lands soon after the Norman invasion by King William, the invader in 1066 AD. The family was considered to descend from Pierre Anselm, priest of Canterbury, Ansell being the abbreviation picked by most sections of this noble Norman family who guided the invaders into England.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Petrus Anselmus, dated about 1192, in the “Pipe Rolls of Sussex.” It was during the time of King Richard 1st, who was known to be the “Richard the Lionheart,” dated 1189-1199. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Ansell had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Ansell landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Ansell who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Edward Ansell settled in Nevis in 1663. Elizabeth Ansell who settled in Virginia in 1685.

People with the surname Ansell who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Sarah Ansell landed in Virginia in 1701. Peter Ansell, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1752.

The following century saw much more Ansell surnames come. Some of the people with the name Ansell who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included John Ansell landed in New York in 1833.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Ansell who landed in Australia in the 19th century included James Ansell arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Bolivar” in 1850. Elvira Louisa Ansell and Stella Ann Ansell, both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Wellington” in the same year 1851. James Ansell arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Taymouth Castle.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Ansell who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included T F Ansell landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1844. Thomas Ansell arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Endymion” in 1873.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ansell: England 5,974; United States 2,425; Australia 1,471; South Africa 1,114; Canada 661; New Zealand 509; Scotland 368; Wales 350; France 122; United Arab Emirates 84.

Notable People:

Alfred Ansell (1876–1941), was a New Zealand political leader.

Barbara Ansell (1923–2001), was a British specialist.

Bryan Ansell (active from 1979), is a British war game developer.

Cameron Ansell (born 1992), is a Canadian voice actor.

Caroline Ansell was an old British Party leader and representative of Parliament (MP) for Eastbourne since 2015.

Charles Ansell (painter) (born 1752), was an English artist.

Charles Ansell (1794–1881), was a British actuary.

David A. Ansell (born 1952), is an American writer.

Ansell Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Gu. a bend fusilly or. Crest—A demi lion ppr. ducally gorged and chained or.
2) Erm. on a fesse gu. three cresents or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
19. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
20. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
21. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
22. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
23. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
24. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil
25. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117
26. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
27. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
28. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106