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Antrobus Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Antrobus Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Antrobus Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Antrobus. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Antrobus Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Antrobus blazon are the bittern, lozengy and estoile. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, azure and or .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The crane, heron and stork are commonly to be found on a coat of arms but all tend to share the same stylised appearance 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164. The bittern is yet another variant of the heron group, the different name perhaps used because of a resemblence to the family name.

Anyone who has seen a typical Jester’s or Harlequin’s outfit has seen the treatment known as lozengy – a pattern of interlocking diamonds of two different colours 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozengy. It normally covers the whole field of the shield, as in the ancient arms of FITZ-WILLIAM, Lozengy, argent and gules, a striking example of the form.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Antrobus Name

Antrobus Origin:

England

Origins of Antrobus:

This unique name is of Old Norse origin and is a geographical surname from the place in Cheshire called “Antrobus.” The placename was noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Entrebus,” and in the Pipe Rolls of Cheshire of 1282 as “Anterbus.” The origin of the name is from the Old Norse particular name “Eindrithi” or “Andrithi,” with the Old Norse “buski,” which means plant, bush or thicket, the whole name thus meaning “Andrithi’s bush.” Many placenames of Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse origin created in a similar fashion, with a particular name and a geographic feature like wood, hill or brushwood, showing ownership of the place. One Thomas Antrobus shows on the Record of the University of Oxford in 1600. Elizabeth, daughter of John and Anne Antrobus, named at St. Brides, Fleet Street, London in the January 1652.

Variations:

More common variations are: Antrobuss, Antrobius, Antroubus, Antrbus, Antropus, Antrabus, Antrobis, Antropius, Anterbos, Intribus

England:

The surname Antrobus first appeared in Cheshire at Antrobus, a local church, and hamlet in the parish of Great Budworth, union of Runcorn and the hundred of Bucklow. The place name records back to the Domesday Book where it noted as Entrebus.

The very first recording spelling of the family shown to be that of Joseph Antobus (marriage to Ann Parr), dated about 1572, in the “Frodsham,” Cheshire. It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth I who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess,” dated 1558- 1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Antrobus had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Antrobus landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Antrobus who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Joan Antrobus who settled in Massachusetts in 1635.Joan Antrobus at the age of 65, arrived in New England in 1635.Benjamin Antrobus who settled in West New Jersey in 1664. Jer Antrobus, who landed in Virginia in 1698. Sara Antrobus, who landed in Virginia in 1698.

People with the surname Antrobus who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Joseph Antrobus, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1700. Thomas Antrobus, his wife Margaret, and four daughters, settled in Georgia in 1733. Mr. Antrobus, who landed in Georgia in 1735.

The following century saw more Antrobus surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Antrobus who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Alfred Antrobus at the age of 24, who landed in America from Alderly Edge, England, in 1911. Edmond Antrobus at the age of 24, who landed in America from London, England, in 1911. Edward Antrobus at the age of 64, who shifted to the United States from Amesbury, England, in 1913. Alice Antrobus at the age of 17, who settled in America from Bury. England, in 1914. Frank Antrobus at the age of 45, who moved to the United States from Liverpool, in 1917.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Antrobus who landed in Australia in the 19th century included William Antrobus, an English prisoner from Lancaster, who shifted aboard the “Albion” in May 1828, settling in New South Wales, Australia.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Antrobus: England 1,382; South Africa 657; United States 646; Australia 191; Canada 174; Barbados 78; Scotland 53; France 49; New Zealand 40; Trinidad and Tobago 13.

Notable People:

John Antrobus (1806 –July 1878) was an English priest and cricket player who played for Cambridge University in 1826.

John Antrobus was born in July 1933. He is an English playwright and script composer. He has written widely for the stage, screen, TV, and radio, the epic World War II play, Crete and Sergeant Pepper at the Royal Court.

Antrobus Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Antrobus Hall, Cheshire and Rutherford, co. Roxburgh, Bart., 1815). Motto—Dei memor, gratus amicis. (confirmed by Camden, Clarenceux, Sept. 1604 to Thomas Antrobus, one of the six clerks in Chancery). Lozengy or and az. on a pale gu. three estoiles of the first. Crest—Issuing out of rays ppr. a unicorn’s head couped ar. horned and maned or, gorged with a wreath of laurel vert. Supporters—Two white horses ppr.
2) Ar. three bitterns gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozengy
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
15. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
17. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
20. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
21. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
22. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
23. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
24. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164
25. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lozengy
26. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
27. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
28. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77