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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: None. Blazon: Ar. on a mount vert, a tree pierced through in bend by a sword ppr. upon the point a crown. Crest—A lion’s head erased.
2) Notes: None. Blazon: Erm. on a chief gu. two griffins respecting each other ar. Crest—A cherub’s head ppr. wings in saltier. Motto—Virtute et constantia.
3) Notes: None. Blazon: Erm. on a chief gu. two griffins respecting each other ar. Crest—A cherub’s head ppr. wings in saltier. Motto—Virtute et constantia.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Auld Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Auld Origin:

England

Origins of Auld:

It is an unusual and interesting surname of Anglo-Saxon origin, and acquired from the Middle English (1200 - 1500) "old," from the Olde English pre 7th Century "eald," which means old. The word perhaps was used as a pet name, not certainly mentioning old age, but rather used to differentiate from an older to a younger ancestor of the similar name. A significant group of old European surnames were created from the continual use of love names. The pet names given in the first example related to a variety of qualities, like physical characteristics or qualities, mental and moral qualities, considered to match to an animal's or bird's appearance, style of dressing, or profession. The new surname can also appear as Old, Ould, Ault, Aude, Olman and Oldman. A wedding was listed in London of James Auld and Margarett Brown, in September 1694 at St. James', Dukes Place.

Variations:

More common variations are: Aulad, Aulde, Aould, Aulid, Aueld, Aauld, Ald, Uld, Aoulad, Aouled.

Scotland:

The surname Auld was first found in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Air), anciently a division in the southwestern Strathclyde area of Scotland, that today builds the Conference Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire, where the surname listed as Ealda in an Old English document of 765.

England:

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Wulfston Ealda, dated about 1060, in the "Old English By names," Kent. It was during the time of King Edward, who was known to be the “The Confessor," dated 1042-1066. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Auld had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Auld settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the individuals with the name Auld who landed in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Auld of Kilbride who banished to North America in 1679. He was sold as a slave in North Carolina for five years

People with the surname Auld who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Jacob Auld, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1756.

The following century saw much more Auld surnames come. Some of the population with the surname Auld who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included William Auld, who landed in America in 1805. Margaret Auld, Mary Auld and Mury Auld, all arrived in New York, NY in the same year 1811. Alexander Auld, who landed in Mobile County, Ala in 1834.

Some of the population with the surname Auld who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included James Auld, who landed in Colorado in 1904.

Australia:

People with the surname Auld who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Kilpatrick Auld arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Glenswilly" in 1839. Eliza Auld, aged 37, a milliner, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Switzerland." Marian Auld, aged 23, a dairy maid, arrived in South Australia in 1859 aboard the ship "Escort."

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Auld who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Agnes Auld at the age of 25 arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Helenslee" in 1864. James Auld at the age of 22 arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "India" in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Auld: United Stats 3,543; Australia 1,840; England 1,586; Scotland 991; Canada 947; South Africa 712; New Zealand 367; Northern Ireland 250; Germany 235; Jamaica 232.

Notable People:

Eric Auld (1931–2013), was a Scottish painter.

James Auld (politician) (1921–1982), was a Canadian politician.

James Muir Auld (1879–1942), was an Australian artist.

Jim Auld was a New Zealand rugby player.

Auld Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Auld blazon are the sword, lion, griffin and cherub. The four main tinctures (colors) are ermine, vert, gules and argent.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 4. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 5. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 6. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”7. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 8. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.9.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 10. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 11.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 12. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 13 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 14 15 16. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 17 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 18, a sentiment echoed equally today.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 19 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 20. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]21

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References

  • 1 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
  • 4 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 5 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
  • 6 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 7 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 8 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 9 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
  • 10 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 11 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 12 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
  • 13 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
  • 14 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
  • 15 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
  • 16 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
  • 17 A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
  • 18 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
  • 19 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
  • 20 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
  • 21 Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150