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Origin, Meaning, Family History and Auld Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Auld Origin:

England

Origins of Auld:

It is an unusual and interesting surname of Anglo-Saxon origin, and acquired from the Middle English (1200 - 1500) "old," from the Olde English pre 7th Century "eald," which means old. The word perhaps was used as a pet name, not certainly mentioning old age, but rather used to differentiate from an older to a younger ancestor of the similar name. A significant group of old European surnames were created from the continual use of love names. The pet names given in the first example related to a variety of qualities, like physical characteristics or qualities, mental and moral qualities, considered to match to an animal's or bird's appearance, style of dressing, or profession. The new surname can also appear as Old, Ould, Ault, Aude, Olman and Oldman. A wedding was listed in London of James Auld and Margarett Brown, in September 1694 at St. James', Dukes Place.

Variations:

More common variations are: Aulad, Aulde, Aould, Aulid, Aueld, Aauld, Ald, Uld, Aoulad, Aouled.

Scotland:

The surname Auld was first found in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Air), anciently a division in the southwestern Strathclyde area of Scotland, that today builds the Conference Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire, where the surname listed as Ealda in an Old English document of 765.

England:

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Wulfston Ealda, dated about 1060, in the "Old English By names," Kent. It was during the time of King Edward, who was known to be the “The Confessor," dated 1042-1066. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Auld had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Auld settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the individuals with the name Auld who landed in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Auld of Kilbride who banished to North America in 1679. He was sold as a slave in North Carolina for five years

People with the surname Auld who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Jacob Auld, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1756.

The following century saw much more Auld surnames come. Some of the population with the surname Auld who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included William Auld, who landed in America in 1805. Margaret Auld, Mary Auld and Mury Auld, all arrived in New York, NY in the same year 1811. Alexander Auld, who landed in Mobile County, Ala in 1834.

Some of the population with the surname Auld who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included James Auld, who landed in Colorado in 1904.

Australia:

People with the surname Auld who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Kilpatrick Auld arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Glenswilly" in 1839. Eliza Auld, aged 37, a milliner, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Switzerland." Marian Auld, aged 23, a dairy maid, arrived in South Australia in 1859 aboard the ship "Escort."

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Auld who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Agnes Auld at the age of 25 arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Helenslee" in 1864. James Auld at the age of 22 arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "India" in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Auld: United Stats 3,543; Australia 1,840; England 1,586; Scotland 991; Canada 947; South Africa 712; New Zealand 367; Northern Ireland 250; Germany 235; Jamaica 232.

Notable People:

Eric Auld (1931–2013), was a Scottish painter.

James Auld (politician) (1921–1982), was a Canadian politician.

James Muir Auld (1879–1942), was an Australian artist.

Jim Auld was a New Zealand rugby player.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: None. Blazon: Ar. on a mount vert, a tree pierced through in bend by a sword ppr. upon the point a crown. Crest—A lion’s head erased.
2) Notes: None. Blazon: Erm. on a chief gu. two griffins respecting each other ar. Crest—A cherub’s head ppr. wings in saltier. Motto—Virtute et constantia.
3) Notes: None. Blazon: Erm. on a chief gu. two griffins respecting each other ar. Crest—A cherub’s head ppr. wings in saltier. Motto—Virtute et constantia.

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References

  • 1 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
  • 4 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 5 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
  • 6 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 7 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 8 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 9 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
  • 10 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 11 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 12 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
  • 13 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
  • 14 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
  • 15 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
  • 16 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
  • 17 A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
  • 18 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
  • 19 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
  • 20 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
  • 21 Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150