Baker Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Baker Family Coat of Arms

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Baker Coat of Arms Meaning

Baker Name Origin & History

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Baker Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Baker blazon are the lion passant, escallop, saltire engrailed and swan. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The saltire, whilst frequently associated with Scotland is actually a widely used and popular ordinary found throughout all of British Heraldry, perhaps because of its cross-like form 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 42. In order to allow for clear differences between similar arms, heralds designed a series of decorative edges, not all of them are appropriate for the saltire (because of the interior angles) but those are suitable can be very effective artistically. The pattern engrailed works well here. It is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Baker Name

Baker Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Baker is most likely derived from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “boeccure,” which was a given name derived from the Old English word “baecere” which can be translated to mean “one who bakes” or “to bake.” The surname of Baker is occupational, but can have more than one meaning. The possible occupations for someone who would have originally been given the surname of Baker include: someone who was directly in charge of the baking ovens in a large establishment, such as a castle or monastery; someone who was in charge of the community or communal kitchen in a town or a village (because most of these sparse homes did not have a kitchen in feudal times, but rather a communal kitchen used by everyone in the town or village; except for nobility.) Another possibility for someone to earn the surname of Baker was for someone who specifically made fine breads and roles, of artisan quality. Another possible occupation for someone who had the surname of Baker was one who owned or maintained a kiln that was used to create building materials, such as pottery, or bricks. It is important to remember that occupational surnames were only given to the person who actually carried out the job associated with the surname. They were then given to the son of the original person who was named as such, but only if he followed his father into the career path. The name became hereditary after the second generation of men to carry out this task existed in a single family.

Variations:

More common variations are: Backer, Beaker, Bakker, Boaker, Bawker, Baiker, Bakeer, Bakery, Bakeri

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Baker can be found in the country of England. One person by the name of one William le Bakere, who was mentioned in the Pipe Rolls of Norfolk in the year 1177. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry II, who was commonly referred to and known throughout history as “The Builder of Churches.” King Henry II ruled from the year 1154 to the year 1189. In England, the female form of this surname is said to be Baxter, and both names have almost fifty entries in the Dictionary of National Biography, and at that time, was arguably one of the most popular surnames in all of England. Those who carry the surname of Baker can be found in large concentrations in the counties of Devon, Hampshire, Essex, Surrey, and Sussex.

Scotland:

The population of those who carry the surname of Baker can be found throughout the country of Scotland. However, the area with the largest concentration of those who bore the surname of Baker can be found in Lanarkshire County.

United States of America:

The European Migration brought many settlers to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World, or The Colonies. The first person to bear the surname of Baker in the United States was one Edmund Baker, who arrived in the state of Maine in the year of 1630. In the year 1633, Geo Baker landed in the state of Virginia, closely followed by Daniell Baker and Dorothie Baker in 1635. Those who carry the surname of Baker can be found in New York, Missouri, California, Illinois, Washington, and the state of Ohio.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Baker: United States 455,577; England 74,748; Australia 38,196; Canada 30,778; Uganda 18,484; South Africa 17,460; Nigeria 8,406; New Zealand 5,486; Wales 4,357; Jamaica 4,301

Notable People:

David Nathaniel Baker Jr. (1931-2016) who was a symphonic jazz composer from America

Lennie Baker (1946-2016) who was a singer and saxophone player from America, was a member of the rock group Danny and the Juniors, which was prevalent in the 1950’s era

Elzie Wylie “Buddy” Baker Jr. (1941-2015) who was a NASCAR racecar driver from America

Miss Amelia Millie Anne Baker (died in 1915) who was a First Class passenger from New York, New York, who was aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and who perished in the sinking of this vessel in the year 1915

Miss Eva Baker (died in 1915) who was a Second Class passenger from New York, New York, who was aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and who perished in the sinking of this vessel in the year 1915

Howard Henry Baker Jr. (1925-2014) who was a former Senate Majority Leader, served as a U.S. Senator from Tennessee who was a Republican, and served as the White House Chief of Staff, served as a United States Ambassador to Japan, and was the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Baker Family Gift Ideas

Browse Baker family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Loventor, co. Devon, bart.). (Claives and Hill Court, co. Worcester). Ar. on a saltire engr. sa. five escallops of the tirst, on a chief of the second a lion pass. of the field. Crest—A dexter arm embowed vested az. cuff ar. holding in the hand ppr. an arrow of the last.
2) (Upper Dunstable House, co. Surrey, bart.). Motto—Fidei coticula crux. (Modbury, co. Devon). Ar. a saltire sa. charged with five escallops erminois, on a. chief az. a lion pass. of the third armed and langued gu. Crest—A demi lion ramp. per fesse indented erminois and pean, supporting in the paws an escallop ar. charged with an ermine spot.
3) (late Littlehales). (Ranston, co. Dorset, and Asbcombe, co. Sussex, bart.). Motto—Finis coronat opus. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a castle betw. two crosses pattee in chief, and in base a key erect sa. on a chief az. two keys also erect or, for BAKER; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a bend cottised sa. three cinquefoils or, a chief gu. charged with three arrows erect, points downwards ppr., for LITTLEHALES. Crests—1st, Baker, A horse’s head erased ar. charged on the neck with a cross pattee fitchee gu. in the mouth a trefoil slipped vert; 2nd, LITTLEHALES, Betw. two wings elevated or, an armed arm embowed ppr. garnished gold, the hand in a gauntlet, grasping an arrow entwined with an olive branch ppr.
4) (Wattisfield and Wrentham, co. Suffolk). Erm. on a fesse engr. az. three fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest—A demi ostrich, wings expanded, holding in its mouth a horseshoe.
5) (co. Kent). Ar. on a fesse nebulee betw. three keys sa. a tower triple-towered of the first.
6) (Chester). Sa. a griffin segreant erm. armed or. Crest—The same as Baker of Shrewsbury, only the tilting spear entire, and on the shaft a ring or.
7) (Elemore Hall, and Crook Hall, co. Durham). Motto—Love and dread. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, erm. on a saltire engr. az. a maunch betw. four escallops or, on a chief sa. a lion pass. of the third, for BAKER; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a tower or, charged with a peahen of the field within a bordure of the second, charged with ten cross crosslets, also of the field, for TOWER. Crests—1st, BAKER, A lion ramp. ar. charged on the shoulder with a saltire az. and supporting betw. the paws a shield of the last thereon a maunch or; 2nd, TOWER, A griffin pass, per pale or and erm. the dexter claw resting on a shield sa. charged with a tower as in the Arms.
8) (Monckwith, co. Essex). Barry of ten or and sa. a bend gu.
9) (Exeter). Erm. on a fesse super engr. sa. three fleurs- de-lis or.
10) (Sisinghurst, co. Kent). Az. three swans’ heads erased ar. beaked gu. Crest—A dexter arm naked ppr. holding a swan’s head erased ar. beaked gu.
11) (Thorngrove, co. Worcester, and Lypeat Park, co. Gloucester). Motto—Persevero. Az. on a fesse betw. three swans’ heads erased or, ducally gorged gu. as many cinquefoils pierced of the last. Crest—A swan’s head erased or, ducally gorged gu.
12) (Waresley, co. Worcester). (Somersetshire). Az. on a fesse engr. betw. three swans’ heads and necks erased or, ducally gorged and beaked gu. as many cinquefoils of the last. Crest—A naked dexter arm, embowed ppr. grasping a swan’s head, and ducally gorged as in the Arms.
13) (Worcestershire and Gloucestershire. Thomas John Lloyd Baker, of Hardwicke Court, near Gloucester, sheriff of the county in 1824, son and heir of the late Rev. William Lloyd Baker, of Stout's Hill, by Mary, his wife, dau. of the Rev. John Lloyd, of Ryton, in Durham, a descendant of William Lloyd, bishop of Worcester). Az. three swans’ heads erased ar. ducally gorged or. Crest—A naked dexter arm ppr. holding a swan’s head erased ar.
14) (Kent). Az. on a fesse betw. three swans’ heads erased or, and ducally gorged gu. as many cinquefoils of the last. Crest—An arm embowed, habited with green leaves, in the hand ppr. a swan’s head erased or.
15) (Kent and Sussex, granted to Thomas Baker, of Battell, co. Sussex, by Camden, Clarenceux, 1625). Ar. a tower betw. three keys erect az. Crest—A musk-rose branch, with buds, all ppr. (another, the roses ar. seeded or).
16) (Lincolnshire and Smallborough, co. Norfolk). Lozengy or and az. on a chief gu. three lions ramp. or. Crest—A demi unicorn erased ar. armed and maned or.
17) (London, granted 1702). Ar. a saltire sa. on a chief of the second, five escallops erm. three and two. Crest—On a mount vert, a tower ar. betw. two laurel branches ppr.
18) (Derby). Motto—Dum spiro spero. Or, three piles one issuant from the chief and two from the base az. each charged with a swan’s head erased ar. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour grasping a caduceus in bend surmounting the truncheon of a tilting spear in bend sinister splintered, all ppr.
19) (Northfleld, co. Worcester, and London, confirmed by Reyley, Blue Mantle, 1646). Motto—Nemo sine cruce beatus. Erm. a fesse engr. betw. three horses’ heads couped sa. Crest—A hand issuing out of clouds ppr. holding a cross calvary sa.
20) (West Hay, co. Somerset). Az. on a fesse engr. betw. three swans’ necks erased or, gorged with ducal coronets gu. as many cinquefoils of the last. Crest: A dexter arm in mail, the under vest seen at the elbow vert the hand ppr. grasping a swan’s neck as in the arms, beaked gu.
21) (Elemore, co. Durham, originally of Crook Hall, founded by Sir George Baker, Knt., Clerk of the Chancery of Durham, who d. in 1667). Ar. on a saltire az. five escallops of the first on a chief az. a lion pass. ar.
22) (Wingfield-Bakes, Orset Hall, co. Essex. William Wingfield, Master in Chancery, assumed the additional name and arms of Baker, 1849, on succeeding to the estates of Richard Baker, Esq. of Orset Hall). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a greyhound courant betw. two bars, sa., for BAKER; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a bend gu. betw. two cottises sa. with a crescent for diff., for WINGFIELD. Crests— 1st, a cockatrice erm. combed and wattled gu., BAKER; 2nd, a griffin pass, vert, Wingfield.
23) (Benjamin Baker, of Miltown, Queen’s Co., d. 21 Feb. 1681, Fun. Ent. Ire.). Az. a fesse or, betw. three swans’ heads erased ar. ducally gorged and beaked of the second. Crest—An eagle displ. sa.
24) (Awsworth, co. Nottingham). Erm. on a chief vert. two boars' heads couped or.
25) (London and Worcestershire). Erm. a fesse engr. betw. three horses’ heads couped sa. Crest—A hand issuing out of the clouds ppr. holding a cross calvary sa. over it this motto, on a scroll—Nemo sine cruce beatus.
26) (Walton, co. Norfolk). Or, on a fesse engr. betw. three cinquefoils sa. as many swans’ heads erased of the first. Crest—On a chapeau az. turned up erm. a stag’s head cabossed or.
27) (alias Lloyd). (Terington, co. Norfolk). Or, on a fesse wavy az. betw. three escallops sa. as many birds ar.
28) (Northumberland). Ar. three bears’ heads erased sa. muzzled or, in chief three torteaux.
29) (Radnorshire). Ar. on a fesse sa. three escallops of the first, in chief nine ears of wheat, in three bunches, two saltireways and one in pale gu. in base three swans’ heads erased of the last, ducally gorged or. Crest—A hawk’s head ar. betw. two wings gu. holding in the beak three ears of wheat of the last.
30) (Shrewsbury). Sa. a griffin segreant (another, reguard.) erm. ducally gorged or, beaked andmembered gu. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet an embowed dexter arm vested or, and gauntlet of the same, holding a broken tilting spear in bend gold, without bur or vamplate, enfiled with a garland vert.
31) (Wells, co. Somerset). Ar. on a fesse gu. three falcons’ heads erased of the field.
32) (originally of Battel, co. Sussex). Ar. a tower betw. three keys erect sa. Crest—On a tower sa. an arm embowed in mail, holding in the hand a flintstone all ppr.
33) Ar. on a fesse engr. sa. fimbriated or. betw. two greyhounds courant of the second, three fleurs-de-lis of the third. Crest—A greyhound’s head erased ar. gorged with a fesse engr. sa. fimbriated or, charged with three fieurs-de- lis of the last.
34) (Lismacue, co. Tipperary). Motto—Honos virtutis satelles. (Fort William, co. Cork). Az. three swans’ heads erased ar. ducally gorged or. Crest—A dexter hand and arm naked holding a swan's head erased ar.
35) (London, confirmed by Cook, Clarenceux, to George Baker of London, and to the descendants of his father, Christopher Baker, of Tenterden, 1573). (Feckenham, co. Wortcester, Visit., 1682). Or, a greyhound courant betw. two bars sa. Crest—A cockatrice erm. combed and wattled gu.
36) (Bayfordbury, Herts). Motto—So run that you may obtain. Per pale erm. and gu. a greyhound courant betw. two bars invected, in chief two quatrefoils, and another in base, all counterchanged. Crest—A cockatrice per fesse indented erminois and pean, combed and wattled gu. gorged with a collar az. and in the beak a quaterfoil slipped vert.
37) Gu. on a cross pattee or, five annulets sa.
38) A goat pass. ar. attired or.
39) (Aldesworth, co. Notts, Visit 1614). Erm. on a chief vert, two boars’ heads couped or. Crest—A boar’s head couped or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 42