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Bale Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Bale Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bale Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Bale. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Bale Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bale blazon are the eagle, mullet and lion. The four main tinctures (colors) are gules, vert, or and sable.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 17A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 19A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 20Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 21Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 22A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 23The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bale Name

Bale Origin:

England, France

Origins of Bale:

This unique surname is of an Old French origin, brought into Britain after the Norman invasion of 1066. It is either a geographical name for a person who resided by a wall of the outer yard of a medieval palace, or a metonymic professional name for an owner of the courts or Bailey. It acquires from the Middle English, “bail(e)” which means the wall of the outer court of a medieval palace. Previous recordings were written as Eudo del Bayle in the 1301 Premium Rolls of Yorkshire, and John Bayl, in the 1382 Feet of Fines of Sussex. In the modern era, the surname can appear listed as Bail, Bayle, Bale, Baile, Baiyle, Bailes, Bails, and Bayles, the other plural forms are almost actually shortened nicknames. Other documentations contain as Thomas Bale of Suffolk in 1524, the naming of Audrey Bale in June 1539, at St. Margaret’s, Westminster, and the calling of Jhone, son of Thome Bale, in March 1559, at St. Michael’s, Wood Street, also London. An interesting recording is that of Hanna Baile at the age of 20 years, who traveled from Liverpool aboard the ship ‘Sardinia’ obligated for New York in May 1846.

Variations:

More common variations are: Beale, Baley, Baile, Bayle, Boale, Balie, Bawle, Bhale, Balea, Baleh.

England:

The surname Bale first appeared in Norfolk at Bale, a hamlet within the local church of Gunthorpe which is sometimes back to the Domesday Book of 1086 where it recorded as Bathele.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard de Baille, dated about 1190, in the record of “St. Bartholomew’s Hospital”, London. It was during the time of King Richard I, who was known to be the “The Lionheart,” dated 1189-1199.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bale settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the individuals with the name Bale who landed in the United States in the 17th century included Alexander Bale, who arrived in Virginia in 1622. Alexander Bale who settled in Virginia in 1623. Vincent Bale, who landed in Long Island in 1683.

People with the surname Bale who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Heinrich Bale, who arrived in New Jersey in 1750. Henry Bale, who landed in New Jersey in 1750. George Bale settled in New England in 1772.

The following century saw many more Bale surnames arrive. Some of the population with the surname Bale who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Dudley Bale landed in New Orleans, La in 1813. James Bale, who came to Minnesota in 1849.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Bale who landed in Canada in the 19th century included Mr. Henry Bale moved to Canada, arriving at the Grosse Island Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship” Nelson’s Village.”

Australia:

People with the surname Bale who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William Bale arrived in New South Wales, Australia sometime between 1825 and 1832.

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Bale who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Philip Bale arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Edwin Fox” in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bale: India 19,080; Nigeria 4,127; England 3,350; United States 3,317; Ivory Coast 2,192; Indonesia 1,536; Flji 1,532; Papua New; Guinea 1,494; Australia 1,246; South Africa 858.

Notable People:

Ernest Bale (1878–1952), was an English cricket player.

Gareth Bale (b. 1989), was a Welsh football player, from Cardiff

John Bale (baseball) (b. 1974), was a baseball player.

Lan Bale (b. 1969), was an old South African tennis player.

Bale Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bale family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: (Carleton-Curlew, co. Leicester, bart.). Blazon: Per pale vert and gu. an eagle displ. or. Crest—A demi lion gu. sustaining a broken spear or.
2) Notes: None. Blazon: Ar. two bars gu. in chief as many mullets pierced sa.
3) Notes: None. Blazon: Ar. three torteaux in fesse.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
17. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
19. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
20. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
21. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
22. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
23. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
25. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
26. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
27. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
28. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
29. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
30. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
31. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
32. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
33. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
34. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
35. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
36. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
37. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
38. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
39. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
40. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
41. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
42. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
43. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
44. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
45. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
46. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60