Ballard Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ballard Family Coat of Arms

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Ballard Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Ballard blazon are the griffin, mullet and trefoil. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, ermine and ver .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Special patterns, of a distinctive shape are frequently used in heraldry and are know as furs, representing the cured skins of animals 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. Although they were originally derived from real creatures the actual patterns have become highly stylised into simple geometric shapes, bell-like in the case of vair. 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P46-49. vair is a particularly interesting example that resonates today – the “glass” slippers worn by Cinderella are actually a mis-translation of “vair” (i.e. fur) slippers, the very same vair that appears in heraldry! 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vair

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]12Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 18A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ballard Name

Ballard Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Ballard derives from a habitual use of nicknames, and comes from a group of surnames that were created because of this purpose. These nicknames usually were created to give reference to physical characteristics, such as moral characteristics, physical elements of the person’s physique, as well as the habits in the way that one dressed, and their occupation. The surname of Ballard derived from the nickname for someone who was a bald-headed man. This surname of Ballard comes from Middle English descriptive words. The word “balle” or “bal” which described a hairless patch on the skull, and the Anglo-Saxon suffix of “ad” which cannot be precisely translated, because the actual meaning has been lost in translation, and throughout history.

Variations:

More common variations are: Ballardo, Baillard, Ballardt, Balliard, Ballardi, Ballarrd, Ballared, Ballaard, Baallard

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Ballard was in the country of England in the year of 1196. One person by the name of Peter Ballard was mentioned in a document from Northamptonshipre. This document was named the “Curia Regis Rolls of Northamptonshire. This document was created, ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Richard I, who was known as and commonlt referred to throughout history as “Richard the Lionheart.” King Richard I ruled from the year 1189 to the year 1199. Those who bear this surname of Ballard can be found in the area of Yorkshire County in high concentrations, but has also spread to the city of London, as well as the counties of Kent and Sussex.

Scotland:

In the country of Scotland, those who bear the surname of Ballard can be found in the areas of Lanarkshire, Aberdeenshire, and Kirkcudbrightshire counties.

United States of America:

During the European Migration, settlers across Europe decided to leave their homes, and sought after a better life. This new life was largely available in the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World, or The Colonies, and promised freedom from religious persecution, new fulfilling and largely available work, and land. However, during the long voyages that it took to make it to the United States, the vessels of travel were cramped, allowing for the spread of disease among much of the traveling population. This not only left some travelers deceased en route to their new life, it also caused many of the emigrating passengers to arrive in the New World ailed by disease. Because of this spread of disease, or lack of recording, there are only a few members of the Ballard family who made it to the United States of America, and these settlers who bore this surname came 30 years into the European Migration. The first person to bear the surname of Ballard was William Ballard, who arrived in New England in the year 1633. In the year 1635, Elizabeth Ballard, who was aged twenty-six years, Hester Ballard, who was aged two years, and Jo Ballard, who was aged one year, all arrived in New England. Those who bear the surname of Ballard in the United States of America can be found in the states of California, Oklahoma, New York, North Carolina, Indiana, Ohio, Tennessee, Alabama, Texas and Illinois.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ballard:

United States 69,726, England 7,071, Australia 3,105, Afghanistan 1,898, Canada 1,72, South Africa 689, France 686, Philippines 644, Germany 538, Brazil 382

Notable People:

James T. Ballard, who was part of the Republican National Convention and was a delegate from Texas in the year 1928, and was a Republican politician from America

Jasper N. Ballard, who was a Member of the Missouri State Senate in the 16th District, from the year 1895 to the year 1898, and was a politician from America

Jeremiah Ballard (died in 1823) who was the Mayor of Elizabethtown, New Jersey from the year 1822 to the year 1823, and was a politician from America

John Ballard, who was a Member of the New York State Assembly from Onondaga County from the year 1804 to the year 1805, and was a Member of the New York State Senate Western District from the year 1806 to the year 1810, and was a politician from America

John A. Ballard, who was the Mayor of Akron, Ohio from the year 1966 to the year 1967, and was a Republican politician from America

John Reginald Ballard (1893-1949) who was an Investigator, and a Member of the West Virginia Democratic State Executive Committee, from the year 1945 to the year 1949, and was a Democratic politician from America

Ballard Family Gift Ideas

Browse Ballard family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Horton, near Canterbury, and Wadhurst, co. Sussex). Sa. a griffin segreant erm. armed and gorged with a crown or, (another, without the crown). Crest—A demi griffin with wings endorsed erm beaked and legged or.
2) (Evesham, co. Worcester). (Greenwich, co. Kent, and Southwell, co. Notts, Visit. Notts 16). Sa. a griffin segreant erm. Crest—A griffin’s head erased erm.
3) Vert a mullet or, betw. three trefoils ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P46-49
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vair
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
12. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
18. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109