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Bamber Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Bamber Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bamber Family Coat of Arms

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Bamber Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bamber blazon are the chevron, fleur-de-lis and bull. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 6A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.7The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

Bulls, and their close relations, cows, calves, oxen and the buffalo are relatively recent additions to the art of heraldry (and it is not always possible to distinguish between them in their renderings). 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull They can be found in a variety of poses and may have horns, hooves and collared in a different colour. The writer Guillim noted that the prescence of a bull could signify ”valour and magnanimity”. 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bamber Name

Bamber Origin:

England

Origins of Bamber:

This interesting and unique surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical name from Bamber Bridge. The place name noted as “Bymbrig” in the Victoria History of the districts of England (no date given), and acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century particular name “Bimme,” and “brycg,” which means bridge. So, the meanings of the name are “Bimme’s overpass, the bridge.” The specific name was listed as “Bimme” in the 1246 Assize Rolls of Lancashire, and is of unknown origin. Among the Middle Ages, when migration for the purpose of job-seeking was becoming more popular, people often took their old hamlet name as a source of recognition, as such concluding in a wide distribution of the name. In the new era, the surname can appear as Bambor, Bambar, Bambro and Bamber. Documentation of the surname from Lancashire Parish Records contains the wedding of Richard Bamber and Annes Hull in January 1564, at Kirkham. The wedding of Annes Bamber and Roger Wraton, in April 1570, at Kirkham and the naming of Robert, son of Thomas and Isabel Bamber, at Standish, in January 1578. A Royal symbol given to the family represents two red chevrons between four black fleurs-de-lis on a silver defense, the Peak being a red bulls head eradicated, attired gold. The Proverb, “Fortis et egregius,” explains as, “Bold and excellent.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Bambery, Bambera, Bambere, Bhamber, Bambher, Bamberi, Bambaer, Bamberry, Bhambere, Bambauer.

England:

The origins of the surname Bamber appeared in Lancashire where people held a family seat from old times. Someone say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Bamber, dated about 1564, at “Kirkham, Lancashire.” It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth 1st, who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess,” dated 1558-1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Bamber had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bamber landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Bamber who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Robert Bamber who settled in Virginia in 1734.

The following century saw much more Bamber surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Bamber who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Margaret, and Robert Bamber settled in New England in 1805.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Bamber who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Charles Bamber arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Isabella Watson” in the year 1846. Charles Bamber, a surgeon, came in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Isabella Watson” in the year 1846.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bamber: England 3,807; South Africa 895; United States 848; Canada 346; Australia 249; Wales 226; Germany 202; Poland 191; New Zealand 149; Scotland 138.

Notable People:

Bessie Bamber was a British expert from Birkenhead who was active in the year 1900 and 1910.

Dave Bamber (b. 1959), is an old English professional football player.

David Bamber (b. 1954), is a British actor.

Earl Bamber (b. 1990), is a New Zealand motor car driver.

Edward Bamber (1646-??), was an English Roman Catholic clergyman.

Helen Bamber (1925-2014), was an English psychotherapist.

Jack Bamber (1895-1971), was an English football player.

Jamie Bamber (b. 1973), i a British actor.

Jeremy Bamber (b. 1961), is a convicted criminal.

Jim Bamber (b. 1946), is an English illustrator.

John Bamber (footballer, born 1912) (1912-??), was an English football player.

Mary Bamber (1874-1938), was an English resident and trade unionist.

Mike Bamber (d. 1988), is a chairperson of Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club.

Bamber Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bamber family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (John Bamber, Esq., of Bamber Hall, co. Lancaster, temp. Charles I.). Motto—Fortis et egregius. Ar. two chev. gu. betw. four fleurs-de-lis sa. Crest—A bull’s head erased gu. attired or.
2) (granted by Hawkins, Ulster, 1711, to Richakd Bamber, formerly a merchant of Dublin). Ar. two chev. gu. betw. three fleurs-de-lis az. Crest—A bull’s head couped gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
7. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
17. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
19. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
20. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
21. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
22. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
23. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
24. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
25. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull
26. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117