Barefoot Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Barefoot Family Coat of Arms

Variations of this name are: Barfoot, Barford.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Barefoot. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

barefoot coat of arms

Barefoot Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Barefoot blazon are the foot, lion’s gamb and fret. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, vert and ermine .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Heraldry is a human art, by and for people and it is not surprising that people themselves are frequently depicted in arms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. Often these are images of knights and men-at-arms, or individual limbs, such as the “three armoured right arms argent” shown in the arms of Armstrong 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 60. As well as the nobility however, we also see both the mundane, ploughmen, fishermen and reapers; and the exotic in the form of club wielding savages and the Moorish or Saracen gentleman with his decorative wreathed turban 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 16A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.The variant lion’s gamb is another word for leg, and its significance remains the same as its parent animal

The fret is a striking charge, often occupying the whole of the field and being two instersecting diagonal lines interlaced with the outline of a square. 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret It is believed to be derived from the image of a fishing net, which it does indeed resemble, and hence Wade believes that it should signify persuasion, although other writers regard it separately as the “the heraldic true lovers knot” 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P118

Barefoot Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Barefoot Name

Barefoot Origin:

England

Origin of Barefoot:

Barefoot is unique surname which derives from Olde English. The surname Barefoot derived from the word “baer” which means bald or nude and “fot,” which means foot which used as a nickname for any individual who commonly lived and worked without shoes on. It is particularly used for priests or religious people and for those who went barefoot as a spiritual reparation for wrong. There were some examples in Ancient England like “Barleg” and “Bareshanke.” The priest in Shakespeare “Romeo and Juliet” was known as “a barefoote brother.” William King and Elizabeth Barfot married in St. George’s Church, Mayfair, in the year 1748.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Bairefoot, Bearefoor, Bare-Foot, Barefoote, Baarefoot, Barfoot, Barefot, Bearfoot, Barfoott, Barfoote.

England:

The name Barefoot first originated in different divisions and communities all over the Britain. A few of the name were in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273, and they consist of Norman Barfot in Lincolnshire, Robert Barefot in Oxfordshire and Alan Barefot in Cambridgeshire. Henry de Bereford recorded in the Pipe Rolls of Gloucestershire in 1204 and Yorkshire. William de Bereford was recorded there in 1325 and after sometime John Berford was recorded there in the year 1419.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Reginald Berfot, which was dated 1203, in the Pipe Rolls of Cumbria. It was during the time of King John, who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199 – 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and very diffferent spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Barefoot settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in 17th and 18th. Some of the people with the name Barefoot who settled in the United States in the 17th century included James Barefoot settled in Maryland in 1634. John Barefoot landed in Virginia in 1634. Mr. Barefoot, who landed in Maryland in 1634. Tho Barefoot and Thomas Barefoot both landed in Virginia in the same year in 1635.

Some of the people with the name Barefoot who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Sarah Barefoot, who arrived in Virginia in 1715 and Elizabeth Barefoot settled in Maryland in 1743.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Barefoot who settled in the Canada in the 19th century included William Barefoot was a fisherman in Pool’s Isle, Newfoundland in 1871.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Barefoot: United States 4,426; England 285; Italy 3; India 2; Indonesia 1; Australia 45; Scotland 2; Canada 183; South Africa 2; New Zealand 12.

Notable People:

Chad Barefoot (born 1983), is an American political leader from North Carolina. A citizen of Thomasville, he reached success in his first election in 2012. Sen. Barefoot sits during the 2013-14 conference of the North Carolina universal Assembly.

Darren Barefoot is an author and administrator of information technology based in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Canada. He is a creative consultant at Capulet Communications, working with high-tech companies. He currently lives in Vancouver.

Herbert Barefoot (1887–1958), was an English representative of the George Cross, an outstanding and award for bravery and for good deeds. He was also an architect.

Ken Barefoot (born 1945), was an American football player in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins and the Detroit Lions.

Magnus Barefoot (1073–1103), famous as Magnus Barefoot was Lord of Norway (as Magnus III) from 1093 till his death in 1103. His estate was grown by military wars and invasions, especially in the Norse-dominated areas of the British Islands, and he eventually spread his rule to Dublin.

Robert Barefoot (born 1944), is a Canadian medical doctor.

William Barefoot (1872–1941), was a British congressman.

Barefoot Family Gift Ideas

Browse Barefoot family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More barefoot Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Gu. on a fesse vert, three men’s feet couped ar.
2) Gu. two lion's paws couped under the knees, the claws endorsed or.
3) (Midlington Place, co. Hants). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three pellets. Crest—A stag statant, ducally gorged.
4) Same Arms. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an arm in armour, holding a sword in bend sinister, all ppr.
5) Gu. a fret of six engr. erm.
6) Same Arms. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an arm in armour, holding a sword in bend sinister, all ppr.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 60
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
16. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P118