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Bare Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Bare Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bare Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Bare. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Bare Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Bare blazon are the dolphin and lion rampant. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and gules.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

In the days before television and the internet it was a rare heraldic artist that had ever seen a dolphin for real, so we should not be surprised that the heraldic representation is not instantly recognisable. Despite this, we should not forget that these artists considered the dolphin to be the king of fish, playing the same role as the lion in the animal kingdom. 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin For reasons not immediately clear, Wade suggests that the dolphin was regarded as an “affectionate fish, fond of music”. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bare Name

This name is a good example of the different ways a nickname could use.  In the Olde English, “Baer” or “Bera” can show a person who went about unarmed and defenceless or who resided in isolation and remained unapproachable to others.  As a Lancashire placename, it finds its roots in Bare(grove) near a Lancashire township.  As a geographic name then it shows anyone dwelling in or near a meadow or grove.  The Priory parish in Cartwell, Lancashire was much used by the Bares in the past.

More common variations are: Beare, Barre, Boare, Barey, Barye, Barea, Bahre, Bareh, Baree, Baure. The surname Bare first found in Austria, where the name Barre became noted for its many branches with the region, each house acquiring a status and authority which envied by the princes of the region.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Roger Bare, dated 1274, in the “Hundred Rolls, Suffolk. It was during the reign of King Edward 1, who was known as “The Hammer of the Scots”, dated 1272-1307.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the people with the name Bare who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Hen Bare, who arrived in Virginia in 1654. People with the surname Bare who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Jonathan Bare, who arrived in Virginia in 1702.  Mark Bare, who landed in Virginia in 1714.  Georg Bare, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1732.  Jarrick Bare, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1732.  Ulrich Bare, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1732. The following century saw much more Bare surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Bare who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Samuel Bare, who arrived in New York, NY in 1816.  John Bare, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1872.  Hermann Bare, aged 27, who landed in New York, NY in 1879.

Bare Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bare family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Az. two dolphins hauriant or.
2) Gu. three lions ramp. ar.
3) Ar. two endorses, as many barrulets gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
12. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141