Call Us Today! 1.555.555.555|info@yourdomain.com

Becton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Becton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Becton Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Becton. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

becton coat of arms

Becton Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Becton blazon are the spade irons, tiger and mullet. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

It is important that a coat of arms be easily recognised and so everyday objects were frequently used as clearly identifiable charges – tools 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69 being a common and important example of these, of which the spade is typical. Some of these tools are rather obscure to modern eyes, who of us nowadays would recognise a hemp-break 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163, let alone know what to use it for! Nevertheless, for mediaeval peasant it was a clearly identifiable symbol. For its symbolism we need look little further than its intended use, as a tool of the working man.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 The tiger is an interesting example here being named after a real animal but depicted in rather and mythical appearance. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tiger Later arms came to use a more lifelike appearance and the usage of heraldic tiger and natual tiger arose to make the distinction. Wade tells us that the mythical bearing of such a creature signifies “great fierceness and valour when enraged” and suggests that we should be wary as the holder may be “one whosee resentment will be dangerous if aroused”! 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Becton Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Becton Name

We don’t yet have this section of research completed for this name. If you are interested in being notified when research becomes available, please use this form to contact us and we will let you know as soon as we have something!

Becton Family Gift Ideas

Browse Becton family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More becton Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Az. three spade irons or. Crest—A demi heraldic tiger ducally gorged and chained holding betw. the paws a mullet of six points.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tiger
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
19. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
20. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163
21. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
22. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tiger
23. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63
24. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
25. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
26. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105