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Origin, Meaning, Family History and Berryman Coat of Arms and Family Crest

This unusual name is both Olde English and Olde French (i.e. pre 1066) in origin.  It acquires from the word 'Burri or Berri' explaining as a fortress or palace and means 'one who dwelt at the castle' and is also professional name for a guard or keeper of the castle. More common variations are: Bearryman, Berrymann, Beeryman, Berroyman, Berrymany, Berrymain, Beryman, Berrman, Berrymn. The surname first found in Hampshire, where they held a family seat from old times.

People with the surname Berryman who landed in the United States in the 18th century included William Berryman, who arrived in Virginia in 1638.  William Berryman, who landed in Virginia in 1657.  John Berryman who arrived in Virginia in 1663.  Mary, who landed in Maryland in 1671. The following century saw much more Berryman surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Berryman who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Robert Berryman, who settled in Virginia in 1718.

Some of the individuals with the surname Berryman who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Henry Berryman, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Childe Harold" in 1849.  Thomas Berryman, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "David Malcolm" in 1849.  John H. Berryman, aged 18, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship "Wanderer".  John Berryman, aged 20, who arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship "Omega". Andrew Berryman, aged 22, a miner, who arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship "Sea Park". Some of the population with the surname Berryman who arrived in  New Zealand in the 19th century included Edward Berryman, aged 21, a farm labourer, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Assaye" in 1874.  Matthew Berryman, aged 21, a farm labourer, who arrived in New Plymouth aboard the ship "Halcione" in 1875.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Devonshire). Motto: Via trita cst via tuta. Blazon: Argent a chevron between three horses passant sable. Crest—A horse's head erased sable.

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References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 2 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 4 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 5 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 6 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
  • 7 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
  • 8 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 9 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45