Bingham Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bingham Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Bingham Coat of Arms Meaning

Bingham Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Bingham. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

bingham coat of arms

Bingham Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Bingham blazon are the cross pattee, water bouget, lion and mullet. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, azure and gules .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross pattee is typical of these, pattee meaning “spreading”, and so the ends of the arms of the cross curve gently outwards to rather pleasing effect. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Pattée

A wide variety of inanimate objects 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281 appear in coats of arms, so of them still recognisable today, others now rather obscure. The images used are often simplified and stylised, the water bouget is a typical case of the later, such that the casual observer would be hard pressed to discern its function. It represents in fact a yoke with two skins attached to be worn over the shoulder and has been found in coats of arms almost from the beginning of the art. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water Bouget. Somewhat literally, Wade suggests that their appearance on arms may have been due to a holder who had “brought water to an army or beseiged place”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P114

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 18Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 19A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 20The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Bingham Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bingham Name

Bingham Origin:

England

Origins of Bingham:

The surname of Bingham originated from the country of England. Within the country of England, there was a village which was known as Bingham; the village is now a parish in the city of Nottingham. This means that the surname of Bingham was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Bingham, it derives from an Old English Pre 7th Century Norse-Viking word of “bingr,” which can be translated to mean a “byr” or a “manager,” and the combination of the element of “ham,” which can be translated to mean “a farm.” The surname of Bingham is also an occupational surname. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Bingham most likely worked on a farm, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son.

Variations:

More common variations are: Beingham, Binggham, Binhgham, Binghame, Binghamm, bin Gham, Binghham, Binngham, Bingam, Bngham

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Bingham is found within the country of England. One person by the name of William de Bingeham was mentioned in the Pipe Rolls of Nottingham in the year of 1175. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry II of England, who was known throughout the ages, and commonly referred to as “The Builder of Churches.” King Henry II ruled from the year of 1154 to the year of 1189. Other mentions of the surname of Bingham within the country of England included one William de Bingham, who was recorded as residing in the area of Lincoln in the year of 1257, and one William Byngham who was mentioned in the Assize Register of the city of Nottingham in the year of 1433. Those who bore the surname of Bingham within the country of England are found in large concentrations in the city of Nottingham, especially because of the original village of Bingham which was originally found in this city.

United States of America:

Within the 17th century, it became common for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World, or the Colonies. These settlers were displeased with the state of the governments in their home countries, and the living conditions that accompanied these governments. The New World promised religious freedom, the ability to own land, and the formation of jobs. The first person to bear the surname of Bingham within the Colonies was one John Bingham, who arrived in the state of Virginia, and who settled there in the year of 1653.

 

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bingham: United States 30,065; England 7,486; Australia 2,180; Canada 1,601; South Africa 1,443; Northern Ireland 1,192; Scotland 610; Jamaica 589; Germany 572; New Zealand 350

Notable People:

Hiram Bingham, who was a Congregationalist missionary in the state of Hawaii, and who was from America

George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879) who was a painter and frontier politician from America

Seth Bingham (1882-1972) who was an organist, composer, and an American professor who taught at Columbia University

John Armor Bingham, who served as a Congressman from the state of Ohio, and who served as a Judge in the trial of the President Abraham Lincoln assassination, and who was a politician and a lawyer from America

Stuart Bingham (born in 1976) who was a professional snooker player from the country of England, and who was awarded the title of World Snooker Champion in the year of 2015

John Michael Ward Bingham (1908-1988) who served as the 7th Baron of Clanmorris, and who was also a crime fiction writer and spy from the country of England

Lord George Charles Bingham (born in 1967) who is an investment banker from the country of England, and who was the only son fo the 7th Earl of Lucan, and who is missing, and presumed dead

Charlotte Bingham (born in 1942) who is a novelist from Britain

 

Bingham Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bingham family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More bingham Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Binghams-Melcombe, co. Dorset, a family of Saxon origin, originally of Sutton Bingham, co. Somerset). Motto—Spes mea Christus. Quarterly, 1st, az. a bend cottised betw. six crosses pattee or, for Bingham; 2nd, erm. a lion ramp. gu. crowned or, for Turbervill; 3rd, az. three arrows erect or, for Chaldecott; 4th, per bend ar. and sa. four lozenges in bend betw. six fleurs-de-lis, all counterchanged, for Potenger. Crest—On a rock ppr. an eagle rising or.
2) (The Vines, Rochester, co. Kent). Arms, &c., same as Bingham, of Binghams-Melcombe.
3) (Earl of Lucan). Motto—Spes mea Christus. (Bingham Castle, co. Mayo). Az. a bend cottised betw. six crosses pattee or. Crest—On a mount vert a falcon rising wings expanded ppr. armed membered and belled or. Supporters —Two wolves az. plain collared and chained or.
4) (Lord Clanmorris). Motto—Spes mea Christus. Az. a bend cottised betw. six crosses pattee or, quartering Turberville and Shaen. Crest—A rock thereon an eagle rising all ppr. Supporters —Two lions ppr.
5) (registered 1708 to Henry Bingham, Esq., son of Charles Bingham and Mary Anne his wife, heiress of Henry Blennerhasset, Esq., co. Fermanagh). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az a bend plain cottised betw. six crosses pattee or, for Bingham; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a fess erm. betw. three dolphins naiant ar., for Blennerhasset. Crest—On a mound vert an eagle rising ppr.
6) (Hertfordshire). Vert a cross moline or.
7) (Kent. Visit, co. Notts. 1614). (Bingham, Car Colston, and Watnall Chaworth, co. Nottingham). Or, on a fesse gu. three water bougets ar.
8) Or, a fesse gu. betw. three water bougets sa.
9) (Nottinghamshire). Or, on a fesse gu. three water bougets erm.
10) (Nottinghamshire). Or, on a fesse betw. three mullets gu. as many water bougets ar.
11) Per pale ar. and sa. a lion ramp. or, armed gu. (another, the lion crowned or).
12) (or Bengham) Az. a fesse dancettee ar.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Pattée
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water Bouget
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P114
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
19. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
20. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60