Bish Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bish Family Coat of Arms

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Bish Coat of Arms Meaning

Bish Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Bish. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Bish Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Bish blazon are the rose, key, chevron and bendlet. The four main tinctures (colors) are or, gules, argent and sable.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The key is a typical example of this. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 In other cases, Wade suggests that their appearance can be taken to indicate “guardianship and dominion”. 116The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 17A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.18The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bish Name

Bish Origin:

England

Origins of Bish:

Listed as Bush, Bushe, Busk, Buske, Bish, Bishe and Byshe. It is a surname of English origins. It is not only one of the oldest of all listed surnames in the Old World, but it is also one of the very early names in the modern world, with John Bush, registered as residing at “Elizabeth Cittie, Virginia” in February 1623. The name origin is geographical and acquires from a pre 7th-century word “busc” which is used for an individual who resided by a different brush or plant, possibly meaning someone who lived by a protective wall of thorn and brier trees which is covered by many fields and arrangements. The previous lists consist of Roger atte Buske, also famous as Roger del Bushe, in the Pipe Rolls of the division of Suffolk in 1305, and Roger Byssh, who may also have been the similar individual, in the Fees Court of Suffolk in 1309. Other previous documents from the London Church Registers contain Agnes Bush, who married William Harnson in June 1568, at St. Dunstan’s Stepney, and Anna Bishe at St Martins in the Farm, Westminster, in June 1617. In December 1629, George Bush was named at St. Giles’ Cripplegate. He may have been an old ancestor of the American politicians, George Bush and his son George W Bush, who are of real New England stock, though ultimately from Skipton in Yorkshire.

Variations:

More common variations are: Baish, Bisch, Buish, Beish, Bishy, Bishi, Bisha, Bishu, Bisho, Bishe.

England:

The origins of the surname Bish was found in Hertfordshire where people held a family seat from early times, soon after the Norman invasion of England by Duke William in 1066 A.D. They descended from Aluric Bysch, a Norman, who joined William at the war of Hastings.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard de la Busce, dated about 1181, in the “Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire.” It was during the time of King Henry Lind who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches,” dated 1154- 1189.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Bish had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bish settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Bish who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Ursula Bish arrived in Maryland in the year 1641. Robert Bish landed in Virginia in 1664. John Bish and John Bish, both arrived in Pennsylvania in the same year in 1682.

Some of the people with the surname Bish who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Sebastian Bish landed in North Carolina in the year 1737.

The following century saw many more Bish surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Bish who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Leonard, Sebastian, and Theobald; all came to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania between the years 1170 and 1851.

The following century saw many more Bish surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Bish who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Jose Bish at the age of 28 moved to America from Pto Sta Maria, Spain in 1911. Alexander Bish at the age of 26 settled in New York in 1914. Edith Bish and Inez Bish at the ages of 22 and 20 landed in America from Kingston, Jamaica in the same year 1923.

Canada:

People with the surname Bish settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 20th and 19th Some of the individuals with the surname Bish who settled in Canada in the 20th century included Mrs. Bish settled in Saint John, New Brunswick in the year 1907.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bish: United States 3,634; England 667; Australia 382; Canada 176; Germany 336; New-Zealand 111; India 147; Israel 71; Russia 75; Netherlands 151.

Notable People:

Diane Joyce Bish (born May 25, 1941) is an American organist and writer, and main producer and presenter of The Joy of Music television series.

Diane Joyce Bish (born May 25, 1941) is an American author.

Stanley Bish (born 21 May 1951) is an old Dutch football player.

Randy Bish is an American Illustrator.

Bish Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: None. Blazon: Or, a chevron between three roses gules
2) Notes: (Stapleton Bish. Founder of Exeter College, Oxford). Blazon: Argent two bendlets wavy gules within a bordure sable entoyre of keys endorsed and united in the rings or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47
17. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
18. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45