Bisson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bisson Family Coat of Arms

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Bisson Coat of Arms Meaning

Bisson Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Bisson. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
bisson coat of arms

Bisson Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bisson blazon are the holly bush, mullet and blackbird. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and sable .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. Sometimes the species or the part of tree was chosen as an allusion to the name of the bearer, as in Argent three tree stumps (also known as stocks) sable” for Blackstock 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309 Trees of course had long been venerated and its use in a coat of arms may have represented some association with the god Thor 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112Wade assigns the additional meaning of ‘Truth’ to the use of any aspect of the Holly bush 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P131

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 15A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 17A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The crane, heron and stork are commonly to be found on a coat of arms but all tend to share the same stylised appearance 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164. The blackbird is amongst the bird species to appear in heraldry, though in appearance can look a lot like the cornish chough.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bisson Name

Bisson Origin:

England, Frace

Origin of Bisson:

The origin of this unusual surname evolved from French and is a geographical name for a person who resided in the place of a bushland or by an outstanding bundle of thickets. The name acquired from the ancient French word “buisson” which means thicket or bushes. The surname was first listed in the first half of the 16th Century. In the new era, the surname has many different spelling forms, such as Beeson, Besson, Buisson, Boisson, Beston, and many more. The wedding of William Beston and Elizabeth Milborne at St. Antholin, London in January 1541 and Marguerite, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Bisson named at the French Huguenot parish, Threadneedle Street, London in November 1711. A royal monogram given to the Bisson family is a holly-bush on a green curved base, and eight gold stars, six shining stars, on a black boundary, all on a gold shield. On the peak is a blackbird.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Boisson, Buisson, Bissoni, Bissoon, Bissone, Baisson, Beisson, Bission, Biesson, Bissoin.

England:

The name Bisson first appeared in Worcestershire where they held a family seat from early times. The Saxon influence on English history declined after the war of Hastings in 1066. French was the language of court for the next three centuries, and the Norman atmosphere conquered. But Saxon surnames remained. In the 12th century Bissopeston, was first introduced in the year 1199, when William de Bissopeston guarded landed in Worcestershire.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thomas Byston, (assistant at a christening), which dated in April 1540, St. Nicholas Cole Abbey. It was during the time of King Henry VIII, who was known as the “God King Hal,” 1509 – 1547.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bisson settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Bisson who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Gerrais Bisson, who married in 1635 in America.

Some of the individuals with the name Bisson who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Alexander Bisson settled in New York in 1841.

Canada:

Individuals with the surname Bisson settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Bisson who arrived in Canada in the 17th century included Antoine Bisson, married in Duquet in 1671.

Some of the individuals with the name Bisson who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Elie Bisson was a representative of parliament in 1891 in Beauharnois, Quebec.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Bisson who settled in Australia in the 19th century included John Bisson at the age of 48, settled in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “Navarino.” Priscilla Bisson at the age of 23 and Rachel Bisson at the age of 58, both came to South Australia in the same year in 1854 aboard the ship “Emigrant.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Bisson who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Philip Bisson at the age of 28, was a shoe manufacturer, Esther Bisson at the age of 34, Philip Bisson at the age of 5, Adolphus Bisson at the age of 3 and Louisa Bisson at the age of 5 months, all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Cartvale” in the same year in 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bisson: United States 4,585; England 640; France 5,327; Brazil 1,081; Italy 840; Argentina 343; Australia 182; Canada 8,493; Germany 370; Jersey 200.

Notable People:

Alexandre Bisson (1848–1912), was a French scripter and novel writer.

Auguste-Rosalie Bisson (1826–1900), was a French cameraman and brother of Louis-Auguste Bisson.

Baptiste Pierre Bisson (1767–1811), was a French commander of the Napoleonic Wars.

Chris Bisson (born in 1975), was a British actor and entertainer.

Claude Bisson (born in 1931), is a retired Canadian justice.

Ivan Bisson (born in 1946), is an Italian basketball player.

Yannick Bisson (born in 1969), is a Canadian movie and television actor.

Bisson Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Lieut. Bailly, of Jersey, 1875). Motto—Florescit vulnere virtus. Blazon: Or, on a mount vert a holly-bush proper, a bordure sable entoyre of eight mullets of six points pierced of the first. Crest—A blackbird proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P131
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
15. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164