Blackmore Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Blackmore Family Coat of Arms

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Blackmore Coat of Arms Meaning

Blackmore Name Origin & History

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Blackmore Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Blackmore blazon are the crescent and moor’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, sable and argent .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The head of a Moor is frequently borne on the arms of those at one time involved with crusades, possibly associated with some “deeds of prowess”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93 The head is shown typically in a realistic fashion but the precise details are left to the imagination and skills of the artist! 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Head

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Blackmore Name

Blackmore Origin:

England

Origins of Blackmore:

This unusual surname derives from Anglo-Saxon origin, with different spellings like Blackmoor, Blakemore, and Blackmore. It is a regional name from any of the different areas named as Blackmore in Essex, Wiltshire, and Worcestershire and Blackmoor in Dorset acquired from the Olde English pre 7th Century components “bloec” which means “black, dark,” and “mor,” which means hill or slope. Blackmore in Hertfordshire and Blackmoor in Hampshire, the previous types of names are “Blachmere” and “Blakemere,” acquire from the Olde English word “bloec,” and “mere” which means “lake or water source.” The surname dates back to the end of 13th Century, and more documentations consist of one William de Blachomore in 1381 in the Feet of Fines for Norwich. Documents from English Parish Records consist of the naming of Joan Blackmore in April 1543, in East Hanningfield, Essex, and the wedding of John Blackmore and Elizabeth Michael in January 1579, at St. Matthew’s, Friday Street, London. One Richard Doddridge Blackmore (1825 – 1900) was a novel writer and advocate. He got his early education at Blundell’s school, Tiverton, and Exeter College Oxford; he got an M.A. degree in 1852, named to the Bar at Middle Church in 1852. He composed many popular novels containing as “Clara Vaughan” in 1864, “Cradock Nowell” in 1866, “Lorna Doone” in 1869, and many more.

Variations:

More common variations are: Blackmoore, Blackamore, Blackemore, Blackomore, Blakmore, Blackmor, Blacmore, Blackiemore, Black Moore, Blackamoore.

England:

The origins of the surname Blackmore are found in Cheshire where people held a family seat from early times. Someone say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard de Blakemore, dated about 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Oxfordshire.” It was during the time of King Edward II who was known to be the “The Hammer of Scots,” dated 1272 – 1307.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Blackmore settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Blackmore who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Charles Blackmore arrived in Virginia in 1658. Thomas Blackmore settled in Maryland in 1671. William Blackmore landed in Lynn, Massachusetts in the year 1676.

Some of the people with the surname Blackmore who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Joane Blackmore landed in Virginia in 1714. David Blackmore arrived in Massachusetts in 1764. John and George Blackmore came to Boston in 1774.

The following century saw much more Blackmore surnames come. Some of the people with the surname Blackmore who settled in the United States in the 19th century included A Blackmore settled in San Francisco, California in 1850. George Blackmore and James Blackmore, both arrived in Allegany Division, Pennsylvania in the same year in 1876.

Canada:

People with the surname Blackmore settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 18th and 19th. Some of the individuals with the name Blackmore who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Joseph Blackmore arrived at Port Roseway, Nova Scotia in October 1783.

The following century saw much more Blackmore surnames come. Some of the people with the surname Blackmore who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Jean Blackmore arrived at Greenspond, Newfoundland in the year 1817.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Blackmore who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William Blackmore and William Blackmore; both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ships “Ascendant” in the same year 1849. William Blackmore who was an English prisoner from Devon, who shifted aboard the ship” Albion” in May in the year 1828.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Blackmore who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Elizabeth Blackmore at the age of 22 and Mary Blackmore at the age of 19; both arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship “Accrington” in the same year 1863. James Blackmore who was a gardener at the age of 42 arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Golden Sea” in the year 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Blackmore: United States 4,503; England 6,905; Australia 2,230; Canada 2,507; South Africa 438; Scotland 374; Wales 734; New-Zealand 783; Ghana 399; Mexico 471.

Notable People:

Bill Blackmore was an English football player who played for Southampton in 1910.

Clayton Blackmore (born 1964), is a Welsh international football player.

Denis Blackmore is an American mathematician.

Blackmore Family Gift Ideas

Browse Blackmore family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bishops Nympton, co. Devon, Visit. 1620). (Rev. Richard Blackmore, rector of Donhead St. Mary, near Shaftesbury). (Milton Bank, Laugharne, co. Carmarthen). Or, on a fesse betw. three Moors' heads in profile couped sa. as many crescents ar. Crest—A Moor’s head in profile erased at the neck sa. gorged or.
2) (granted 18 November, 1651). Or, a fesse sa. betw. three Moors’ heads erased ppr. Crest—An arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished or, supporting a standard banner of the last, staff of the first, point ar.
3) (London, granted 1706). Or, a chev. embattled betw. three Moors’ heads couped sa. Crest—Out of a mural coronet or, a dexter arm in armour ppr. purfled or.
4) Ar. a fesse dancettee, betw. three Moors’ beads in profile, and couped sa. Crest—Out of a mural coronet an arm embowed in armour ppr. garnished or.
5) Or, a fesse sa. betw. three Moors’ heads erased ppr. Crest—A demi griffin segreant erm.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Head