Which one is mine?

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Sign up today for our newsletter and receive a free video explaining what a “coat of arms” is!

Boger Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Boger blazon are the tower, anchor, sword and dove. The four main tinctures (colors) are or, azure, argent and gules.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”8. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 9. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).10

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 11 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The tower Is a typical example of an object from the world of architecture adopted, albeit in a stylised form, for use in heraldry. It can be placed alone, or frequently with three turrets on the top, known as a tower triple towered, and can have doors and windows of a different colour. 12 In continental European heraldry they are often accompanied by pictorial effects such as armoured knights scaling them on ladders.

A wide variety of inanimate objects 13 appear in coats of arms, so of them still recognisable today, others now rather obscure. The images used are often simplified and stylised, the anchor is a typical case. For any meaning, we need look no further than a nautical or sea-faring heritage. Indeed, some arms go into great detail of the colours and arrangement of the stock, stem, cables and flutes of the anchor reflecting a detailed knowledge of the form and use of this device. 14.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 15. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 16 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Boger Coat of Arms and Family Crest

This section has not yet been completed. If you are interested in having your genealogy done, we offer an affordable research servicethat traces your lineage so you can learn more about your ancestors, where they came from, and who you are.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Edmund Boger, Esq., Capt. B.N.). Blazon: Or, a bend vaire argent and gules cottised azure. between two towers of the last on a canton of the same an anchor in bend sinister of the first, surmounted of a sword in saltire proper. Crest—On a tower or, charged with two lozenges in fess vaire argent and gules a dove with an olive branch in its beak, all proper.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


References

  • 1 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 2 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 3 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
  • 4 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 5 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 8 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 9 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
  • 10 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
  • 11 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
  • 12 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tower
  • 13 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
  • 14 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:anchor
  • 15 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
  • 16 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302
Select your currency
USD
Cart Item Removed. Undo
  • No products in the cart.