Boyland Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Boyland Family Coat of Arms

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Boyland Coat of Arms Meaning

Boyland Name Origin & History

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Boyland Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Boyland blazon are the cross engrailed, eagle and saltorel. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and gules.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67. The pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146, and the saltorel Is a typical example of this, representing a small saltire 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire, of which there can be many present and which can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. They are quite common on the bordures of continental European shields.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Boyland Name

Boyland Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of Boyland:

According to the early recordings of the spelling of the surname, this name was listed withe spellings of Boylan, Boyland, and Boylund, this interesting surname is of either England or Irish origin. The first origin is geographical from a place called Boland in the district of Norfolk. It converts as “Boia’s Grove,” and acquired from the pre 5th-century Germanic particular name “Boio” of unknown origin, and the Olde English or Norse words lund or lundr, which means a forest or thicket of trees. The placename was first listed as “Boielund” in the Domesday Book of 1086. The second possible origin is from the Gaelic name “O’ Baoigheallain,” of unknown origin, however, “gheall” means agreement. In the anglicized spelling, the O’ Boylan’s were a sept from Oriel, which consisted of districts Armagh and Monaghan and parts of South Down, Louth, and Fermanagh. Early examples of the surname documentation are derived from remaining agreements and records containing the naming in Ireland of William, the son of Nicholas Boylan, in October 1643 at St. Michan’s parish, Dublin, and the wedding in London of Philip Boylan and Elizabeth Archdeacon, in November 1777 at St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster.

Variations:

More common variations are: Boylaind, Boylandy, Boayland, Boland, Byland, Bolland, Bowland, Bouland, Baoland, Bysland.

Ireland:

The surname Boyland first appeared in Fermanagh in the southwestern part of Northern Ireland, County of Ulster, where they held a family seat from old times, and declined from the Heremon line of Kings, more especially King Colla da Crioch, one of the three great Kings of Colla, 357 AD.

Many of the people with surname Boyland had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

England:

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert de Boylond, dated about 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Devonshire.” It was during the time of King Edward 1st, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Boyland landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Boyland who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included John Boyland, who landed in America in the year 1764.

The following century saw more Boyland surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Boyland who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included John, Patrick, Richard, Thomas, and William Boyland, all came to Philadelphia between the year 1840 and 1860.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Boyland: United States 1,506; England 565; Australia 258; Wales 113; New Zealand 64; Canada 27; Scotland 26; Ireland 16; Spain 8; Gibraltar 7.

Notable People:

Thomas S. Boyland (August 1942–February 1982) was an American political leader from New York.

Ari Boyland was born in August 1987) is a New Zealand stage and television performer.

William James Boyland (June 1885–July 1967) was an Australian political leader. He was born in Richmond to grocer William Boyland and Emma Rebecca Payne. He was a salesman before serving with the 37th Battalion during World War I. In November 1921, he married Ella Mary Mates. He became a company executive and held land at Box Hill.

Doe Boyland is an old Major League Baseball first baseman. He was selected in the second round of the 1976 Major League Baseball Draft by the Pittsburgh Pirates. He would play in 21 games with the team in 1978, 1979, and 1981. He was later traded to the San Francisco Giants for Tom Griffin.

Steve Boyland is an old association football player who served New Zealand at international level. He made an separate official international appearance for New Zealand.

Boyland Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Norfolk and Suffolk). Az. a saltire engr. or.
2) (Suffolk). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a lion ramp. ar. a bend gu.; 2nd and 3rd, sa. an eagle displ. ar.
3) (Suffolk). Ar. an eagle displ. sa. membered gu.
Gu. three saltorels ar. two and one.
Sa. an eagle displ. ar. armed gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire