Bradstreet Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bradstreet Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Bradstreet Coat of Arms Meaning

Bradstreet Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Bradstreet. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

bradstreet coat of arms

Bradstreet Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bradstreet blazon are the crescent, greyhound and gyronny. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

Gyronny is a very distinctive pattern covering the whole field of the shield, being a series of triangles, drawn from the edges and meeting in the centre of the shield 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gyronny. Each triangle is known as a gyron, and these sometimes appear as charges in their own right 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 55. Wade suggests that the use of gyrons upon a shield should be taken to denote “unity”.

Bradstreet Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bradstreet Name

Bradstreet Origin:

England

Origins of Bradstreet:

The name Bradstreet is of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from when the family resided near a major road. The name literally means by the broad street, and would have been given to someone who resided by one of the major roads of the time. It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has regulated. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Bradstreet are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and combined components of other European languages, even educated people changed the spelling of their names. Authors and priests in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find many variations that refer to a single person. The variations of the name Bradstreet include as Bradstreet, Broadstreet and much more.

Variations:

More common variations are: Broadstreet, Braodstreet, Bardstreet, Brodstreet, Broadstreat, Broudstreet, Bradstred, Bradstrut, Broadstrit, Breedstraet.

England:

The surname Bradstreet first appeared in Derbyshire where they held a family seat from very early times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Bradstreet had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bradstreet landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Bradstreet who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Simon Bradstreet settled in Boston in the year 1630 and later moved to Salem, where, in the year 1679 he became Governor of the Colony. Simon Bradstreet, who arrived in Massachusetts in the year 1630. Humphry Bradstreet at the age of 40, landed in America in the year 1634. John Bradstreet at the age of 3, landed in New England in the year 1634. Martha Bradstreet at the age of 2, landed in New England in the same year 1634.

People with the surname Bradstreet who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Francis Bradstreet, who arrived in Virginia in 1741.

The following century saw more Bradstreet surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Bradstreet who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included H M Bradstreet, who landed in San Francisco, California in the year 1850. B G Bradstreet, who landed in San Francisco, California in the same year 1850.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bradstreet: United States 1,584; Australia 202; England 102; Canada 99; France 49; New Zealand 40; Belgium 22; Hong Kong 2; Spain 2; South Africa 2.

Notable People:

Anne Bradstreet (March 1612 – September 1672), née Dudley, was the most famous of early English poets of North America and the first female author in England’s North American colonies to be published. She is the first Puritan figure in American Literature and notable for her large corpus of poetry, as well as personal writings published posthumously.

James Jeffrey “Jeff” Bradstreet (July 1954 – June 2015), was an American doctor, alternative medicine practitioner, and an old preacher who ran the International Child Development Resource Center in Melbourne, Florida, a medical practice in Buford, Georgia and in Arizona, where he practiced homeopathy.

Major General John Bradstreet (December 1714 – September 1774) was a British Army officer during King George’s War, the French and Indian War, and Pontiac’s Rebellion. He was born in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia to a British Army lieutenant and an Acadian mother. He also served as the Commodore-Governor for Newfoundland.

Simon Bradstreet was the husband of Anne and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony from the year 1679 to 1686.

Tim Bradstreet was an American artist and commercial painter.

James Bradstreet Greenough was an American classical scholar.

Bradstreet Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bradstreet family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More bradstreet Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Stacumnie, co. Kildare, bart.). Motto—Virtute et non vi. Ar. a greyhound pass. gu. on a chief sa. three crescents or. Crest—An arm in armour embowed the hand grasping a scymitar all ppr.
2) (Ireland). Gyronny of six gu. and or, on each a crescent counterchanged. Crest—A unicorn’s head betw. two branches of laurel in orle.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gyronny
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 55