Brenton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Brenton Family Coat of Arms

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Brenton Coat of Arms Meaning

Brenton Name Origin & History

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Brenton Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Brenton blazon are the lion, martlet, swan and savage. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and argent .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

Wade suggests that the appearance of a swan in a coat of arms is perhaps an indication of a musical person, or a “ lover of poetry and harmony”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78 It is generally shown in a lifelike aspect and colouring, although it may be leaked and legged with other colours. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan. It is a popular charge, both on the shield itself and impress, sometimes sitting and sometimes rising as if about to take off in flight. 18A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Brenton Name

Brenton Origin:

England

Origins of Brenton:

This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a geographical name from any of four regions in England which have as their first component, the Olde English pre 7th Century male given name “Bryni” (from “bryne”, which means fire, flame), together with the patronymic addition of “-ing”, which means sons, dependents of, and “tun”, which means an area bounded by some barrier, hamlet. These regions are: Brinton, a church in south-west of Holt in Norfolk, noted as “Brinton” in the 1197 Pipe Rolls, and “Bryneton” in 1291, Brington in Huntingdonshire and Northamptonshire, listed respectively as “Brynintune” in the Anglo-Saxon Chartulary, dated 974, and as “Brintone” in the Domesday Book of 1086 for Northamptonshire. Brineton in Staffordshire and Brenton near Exminster in Devonshire. Geographical surnames, like this, were originally given to local landholders, and the king of the castle, and especially as a source of recognition to those who moved from their mother town to settle another place. In 1273, one Thomas de Brinton listed in the Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire. The naming of Catherine Brenton took place at Crediton, Devonshire, in March 1604, and in April 1616, Christofer Brenton named at St. Botolph’s, Colchester, Essex. Two remarkable name ancestors recorded in the “National Biography,” like Edward Pelham Brenton (1774 – 1839), a navy captain, and Sir Jahleel Brenton (1776 – 1844), vice-administrator of the Navy.

Variations:

More common variations are: Bryenton, Barenton, Bruenton, Brentton, Brentton, Breneton, Berenton, Breinton, Borenton, Brewneton, Brewinton.

England:

The origins of the surname Brenton appeared in Herefordshire where people held a family seat from early times. Someone say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Adam de Brinton, dated about 1272, in the “Hundred Rolls of Oxfordshire.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Brenton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Brenton landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Brenton who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Brenton who settled in Newport, Rhode Island in 1630. William Brenton, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1634. John Brenton, who came to Maryland in 1670.

The following century saw much more Brenton surnames come. Some of the people with the surname Brenton who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Mr. Brenton, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850. Luciano Maria Brenton, who landed in Puerto Rico in 1878.

Canada:

The following century saw much more Brenton surnames arrive. People with the surname Brenton who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Samuel Brenton, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1760.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Brenton who landed in Australia in the 19th century included James Brenton arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Isabella Watson” in 1846. John Brenton arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Himalaya” in 1849. John Brenton arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Himalaya.” John Brenton arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship “Sultana.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Brenton who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Ellen Brenton arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Portland” in 1864.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Brenton: United States 2,303; Canada 906; England 850; Australia 642; South Africa 110; New Zealand 76; Sweden 58; Wales 45; Rusia 6; Czech Republic 4.

Notable People:

Marianne Brenton (1933–2013), was an American political leader.

Brenton Family Gift Ideas

Browse Brenton family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Motto—Go through. Gu. a lion ramp. betw. three martlets ar. on a canton or, the stern of a ship of the line ppr. Crest—Out of a naval crown or, the rim or circle inscribed with the word Spartan, a swan ar. guttee de sang.
2) (Herefordshire). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three martlets sa.
3) Ar. two bars gu. on a canton of the second a cross of the first. Crest—A demi savage affrontee handcuffed ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan
18. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245