Brewin Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Brewin Family Coat of Arms

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Brewin Coat of Arms Meaning

Brewin Name Origin & History

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Brewin Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Brewin blazon are the trefoil, chevron engrailed, mullet and cross moline. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and azure .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries, being in the form of an inverted ‘v’ shape 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron. It is a popular feature, visually very striking and hence developed to have various decorative edges applied to distinguish otherwise identical coats of arms. The edge pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Brewin Name

Brewin Origin:

England

Origins of Brewin:

Listed in many forms such as Brewen, Brewin, Bruan, Brune, the diminutives Brewin and Brewing and the patronymic Brewins, this is an English surname. Dating from the 12th century and the very beginning of surnames, it is perhaps professional. If so, it acquires from the Olde English pre 7th century word “breowan”, which means to brew, and a brewer or sometimes the son of a brewer, and whereas the suffix being a short form of “-kin”, and the secondary addition of’-s’, itself a shortened version of ‘son’. There is also a possible meaning, in that the Olde English-Gaels-Celts were very keen on identifying nicknames, especially those based upon a particular appearance, and it is possible that in some examples, the name may be a patronymic based upon “brun”, which means “the brown-faced (or haired) one”. An example here would be those of Hugh le Brun of Suffolk in 1273, or Johanna la Brune, of the same date and division. Later examples contain as Thomas Bruynne, an observer at the Parish of St. Mary Somerset, in the city of London, in January 1594, Mary Bruens, named at St. Katherine by the Tower (of London), in April 1682; and John Brewin, who married Jane Snar at Howden, East Yorkshire, in November 1735.

Variations:

More common variations are: Bre- Win, Barewin, Brewion, Brein, Brewn, Brwin, Brewen, Burwin, Prewin, Brewan

England:

The surname Brewin first appeared in Leicestershire where they held a family seat from old times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD. The name was originally Bregwin, pronounced as Brewin.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard Briwerra, dated about 1192, in the “Pipe Rolls of Hampshire.” It was during the time of King Richard I, who was known to be the “The Lionheart,” dated 1189 – 1199. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Brewin had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Brewin who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Edward Brewin landed in New York in 1831. William and Thomas Brewin who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1840.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Brewin who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Samuel Brewin, an English prisoner from Leicester, who was transported aboard the “America” in April 1829, settling in New South Wales, Australia.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Brewin who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Robert Brewin arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Bombay” in the year 1863. James Brewin, Peter Brewin and Eliza Brewin, all arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Woodlark” in the same year 1873.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Brewin: England 1,828; United States 388; Australia 297; Canada 227; South Africa 183; Scotland 66; Wales 56; New Zealand 52; Bermuda 19; Singapore 18.

Notable People:

Christopher Brewin was a British international relations professor.

Frank Brewin (1909–1976), was an Indian field hockey player.

Brewin Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a chev. engr. sa. betw. three trefoils slipped vert. Crest—Two eagles’ wings endorsed ppr. semee of trefoils slipped vert.
2) (Loughborough, co. Leicester). Quarterly, or and az., a cross moline, in chief two mullets, pierced, all counterchanged. Crest—An unicorn pass. ar. armed, maned, and tufted or, collared and charged on the body with three mullets, pierced, in fesse az.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105